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tivo more beautiful cascades, but inferior in wild grandeur to the one above mentioned. “ The Eastern Pass of Glencoe” gives a more stern character to this grand scenery than any picture we have yet seen ; and the dreary desolation is heightened by the appear. ance of a deep snow, and the hurried retreat of a party of High. landers from an enemy's forces, who are entering the glen beneath the stupendous mountain, which, girt with storm-clouds, towers high above its rocky mates. “ Cawdor Castle” forms an exceedingly fine plate: is it the Cawdor of which Macbeth became thane?

“ Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be
What thou art promised.”

Altsay Burn," a wild, wooded glen-scene, all darkness and dread, is succeeded by a glimpse of such bright summer-sky beauty, in the view of “Dunolly Castle,” that “bare winter suddenly is changed to spring,” and we are absolutely envying the ladies their intended sail in the little boat now moored under the rocks to receive its fair freight: it is an exquisite picture. “Inverlochy Castle” is invested by the painter with such terrible signs of fire and slaughter, that we feel we ought to remember the incident, either romantic or historical, which is thereby perpetuated; we, however, plead guilty to the crime of forgetfulness, and here venture to hint to the publisher of this most beautiful and covetable work, that the addition of a line to each plate, alluding to the event represented by the figures introduced, whether they are of Scottish history or of Scott's romance, would greatly aid the peruser in his enjoyment of the picture, and certainly could not detract, in any way, from their individual beauty. -« The Drhuim on the Brauby River” is a strange and wildly beautiful scene of rocks, wood, and water; picturesque and strikingly natural, fresh, and uncontaminated by parasol pic-nics or dandy felicity-hunters; a few quiet-looking cows cooling their legs in the water, and a solitary heron watching his finny prey, from a stone, are the sole denizens of the spot. We have rarely seen heighth and depth so faithfully described on paper, as in the view of “Stirling Castle,” which concludes the graphic portion of this part; the castle-crested rocks seem really above your head, while the far-sketched plain beneath lies like a map before down-gazing eyes, making them dizzy in imagination. To utter in print all our feelings of admiration for this work of beauty, were impossible, but, with anxious hopes for its success, we bid it go on and prosper.

LITERARY INTELLIGENCE.

The Rev. Professor Henslow, of Cambridge, has engaged in a new work, to be called The Botanist. It will be conducted by Mr. Naund, the author of The Botanic Garden, and is to combine all interesting points of the science, with popular and practical information.

Shortly will be published, an Ornithological Guide, with the view of sup. plying the Collector with a series of Labels, affording the Ornithologist a chvice of systems. The work will also contain a chapter on Nomenclature, Reviews, and other topics relating to that branch of Natural History.

ABRIDGED LIST OF NEW PUBLICATIONS,

From March 8, 1836, to June 8, 1836.

A popular view of the Progress of Philosophy among the Ancients, by

Joshua Toulmin Smith.
Alexander's Commentaries on Puerperal Fever, &c. &c., 8vo., 5s.
Alison's History of the French Revolution, Vol. V., 8vo, 15s.
Armitage's History of Brazil, 1808–1831, 2 vol. 8vo, 24s.
Back's (Capt.) Artic Land expedition in 1833–4–5, 8vo, 30s., 4to, 63s.
Barrow's (John) Tour Round Ireland, sm. 8vo., 14s.
Britton and Brayley's History of the late Houses of Parliament, 8vo. 11. 1s.,

roy. 8vo. 21. 2s., 4to. 41. 4s.
Combe's (Dr. A.) Physiology of Digestion, sm. 8vo., 78. 6d.
Continental (The) Traveller, &c., by, a Travelling Lawyer, 6s. 6d.
Cooke's (John) Sermons, at Birniingham, 8v0., 12s.
Cottage Husbandry, 8vo., 4s.
Edinburgh Cabinet Library, vol. 18 (China, vol. 1), 12mo., 5s.

vol. 19, (China, vol. 2), 12mo., 58.

vol. 20. (China, vol. 3), 12mo, 5s. Eyton's History of the Rarer British Birds, 8vo., 108. 6d., roy. 8vo., 21s.

Catalogue of British Birds, 8vo, 3s 6d, roy. 8vo, 7s.
Family Library, vol. 56 (Wesley's Natural Philosophy), 18mo., 5s.
Forster's Life of Bishop Jebb, 2 vol. 8vo., 26s.
Gardiner's Journey to the Zoolu Country, S. Africa, 8vo, 20s.
Gould's (John) Birds of the Himalaya Mountains, imp. folio, 141 14s.

Europe, Pts. 1 to 15, imp. folio, each, 31 8s.
-Monograph of the Ramphastidæ (Toucans) imp. folio, 71 78.

Trogonidæ (Trogons), Pts. 1 & 2, each 21 10s.
Greenwood's History of the Germans, (Barbaric Period,) 4to, 52s 6d.
Harding's Sketches at Home and Abroad, imp. folio, 61. 6s., hf.-bd.
Hill (Fred.) on National Education, 2 vol. 12mo., 12s.
Johnson's (Rev. G. H. S.) Optical Investigations, roy. 8vo., 10s.
Landor's (W. S.) Pericles and Aspasia, 2 vol. sm. 8vo., 218.
Langton's (R.) Narrative of a Captivity in France, 1809 to 14, 2 vol. post

8vo., 21s. Lardner's Cyclopædia, vol. 77 (Stebbing's History of the Reformation, vol.

vol. 78, (British Statesmen, vol. 2,) 12mo., 6s.

vol. 79, (Russia, vol. 1,) 12mo. 6s. Latham's (Dr. P. M.) Lectures on Clinical Medecine, 12mo, 6s. 6d. Little's (Dr.) Treatise on Pulmonary Consumption, 8vo., 6s. Macneil on Railways and Locomotive Engines, 8vo., 5s. Macnish's Introduction to Phrenology, 18mo., 2s. 6d.

1), 6s.

Martineau's Rationale of Religious Enquiry, 12mo., 5s.
Mayo's Outlines of Human Pathology, 8vo., 18s.
Nichols Collectanæ Topographica et Genealogica, vol. 3, royal 8vo., 21s.
Palmer's (Dr. S.) Dictionary of French Terms in Anatomy, &c., Part 2. 8vo,bis.
Passavant's Tour of a German Artist in England, 2 vol. sm. 8vo., 21s.
Phrenology Simplified, 18mo., 2s. 6d.
Quain's Anatomical Plates of the Muscles, roy. folio, 21 168.
Random Recollections of the House of Lords, post 8vo., 10s. 6d.
Rankin's White Man's Grave; a Visit to Sierra Leone, 1834, 2 vol. sm.

8vo., 21s. Raumer's (Von) England in 1835, translated by Sarah Austin, 3 vol. sm.

8vo., 24s.
Ross's Appendix to his Second Voyage, &c., 4to, 30s—I. p. 358.
Silvertop's Geology of Granada and Murcia, &c., 8vo., 10s. 6d.
Smith's Catalogue Raisonnée, vol. 8 (Rembrandt), roy. 8vo., 268.
Travelling Opinions and Scetches in Russia and Poland, sm. 8vo, 78 6d.
Weber's Anatomical Atlas, complete, folio, 72. 7s.
Wild's Sketches in Belgium and France, imp. 4to, 16s-India 21s.
Wood's Ornithologist's Text Book, fcap., 3s 6d.

British Song Birds, fcap., 7s.

METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.

Of the three months constituting the spring quarter of 1836, it may be remarked that they were strongly characterised by the proverbial uncertain. ty and rapid change of our English climate; in fact, throughout Europe, all accounts agree in relating the wet, wintery, and boisterous weather of March and April. In the former month, with the exception of two or three days about the middle, there were constantly heavy gales, with rain, snow, and a low temperature_and the latter was almost as wet and cold, but with less wind; several heavy snow and hail storms were experienced during the month, and it snowed heavily the whole of the day on the first. May, on the other hand, has been altogether a dry month, with a great majority of clear and cloudless days ; but the wind throughout has harılly varied from North, N. E., and East and, consequently, it has been very harsh, dry, and cold, together with a hot sun. The natural result has been, that the whole of the surface water has disappeared ; and, notwithstanding the immense quantities of previous wet, vegetation is now suffering much from drought: the productions of the garden, with all kinds of spring crops, and the grass particularly. The nights have been constantly cold; and very frequently, in low situations, there have been sharp frosts. During several nights, both in April and May, strong auroral appearances have been witnessed: there was a considerable display on the evening of the 6th of the latter month, and also on the 19th.

Sunday, May 15, the day on which the late great eclipse of the sun occurred, was a beautiful day, hardly a cloud made its appearance in the sky. The first contact took place about a quarter to two ; at forty minutes past treo Venus was distinctly visible to the naked eye, a few degrees south of the zenith. At the period of greatest obscuration there was a subdued and solemn tone of colouring thrown over the landscape, and the strong shadows cast by the little crescent of light, were curiously softened at their edges, giving to them an unusual character, which the most ordinary observer could not fail of remarking. At this time the atmosphere was perfectly calm, the sky of a deep-blue colour, and the tranquillity of the scene was broken only
by the repeater crowing of the cock, and the lowing of some neighbouring
cattle. The following is a table of the observed heights of the thermome-
ter during this eclipse, which lasted two hours and forty-eight minutes :-
No. 1-A thermometer, with the bulb blackened and placed in the sun's

rays in a little recess against a south wall; No. 2-a delicate little

thermometer, N. E. aspect, in the shade.
The hygrometer, at the beginning of the eclipse, was at 43°, and at the

termination, 44o. Barometer, 29.905.
No.l. No. 2. Time.

No.l. No. 2. Time.
126° 70°
lh. 45m. p. m.

86° 65° 3h. 5m. p. m.
123 69.5 2h,

5m.

81 63

greatest obscura.
118 68 2h. 25m.

89 65

3h. 40m. p. m.
100 67 2h. 45m.

100 65 4h.

Om. p. m.
89 66 3h. Om.

Observers who witnessed the annular appearance of this eclipse, remark-
“ that the light of the sun, although sufficiently diminished to render both
Venus and Jupiter visible, was far ioo powerful to allow any of the fixed stars
to be seen.” Jupiter, notwithstanding his situation was accurately known, was
vainly searched for at Malvern. From the preceding account, great doubt must
be entertained respecting the stories of eclipses, where the birds have retired
to roost, and domestic animals have appeared terrified; for anything darker
than the obscuration from an annular eclipse, must last so short a period,
that by the time the birds had perched themselves upon their roost, the fast-
increasing light would call them on the wing again : at all events, these oc-
currences would not happen except in eclipses central and total.

Great Malvern, June 1.

MARCH

1836 Barometer. Thermometer

Remarks,
Mar. Morn. Even. Max. 1 Min.

Day.

Night.

Wind.
128.620 28.465 45 37 Clouds, rain

Rain

S. W.
2 28.900 29.000 47 36 Sun, clouds, fine

Rain

Westerly
3 29.155 29.230 50 35 Fine, sun, clouds Fine

Wstly., light
4 29.20 28.835 47 36.5 Fine, cloudy

Fine

Wstly., strog
5 28.880 28.80) 48 35 Heavy showers

Light rain S. W.
6 28.655 28.720 45 33 Heavy showers

Fine

S. W.
7 28.860 28.910 45 32 Showery, hail

Fine

S. W.
8 28.930 29.035 43 33

Sun, clouds

Fine

N W.
9 28.895 28.670
31 Rain

Fine

SE
10 28.880 28.635 43 36

Cloudy, showers

Fine

Northerly,
11 28.535 28.700 48
Heavy showers

S. W., v. h.
12 28.670 28.730 44 39

Heavy showers

Very windy Westerly
13 29.135 28.965 47 36 Fine, sun, showers

Hvý showers S. W.
14 28.680 28.780 47 41 Showers

Avy. sbs., wdy. W.N.W.,bois
15 28.600
47 36 Rain, snow, bail

S. W.
16 29,270 29.500 45 33 Fine, sun and clouds Very windy Westerly
17 29.330 29.625 515
Fine, cloudy, showers

Wstly., bois.
18 29.830 29.840 57.5 47 Fine, cloudy

Fine

S. W.
19 29.710 29.640 57 5 43 Fine, all sun

Cloudy

8. W.
20 29.700 29.710 59.5 47 Fine, all sun

Light, Norly.
21 29.590 29.450 52.5 46 Fine, clouds, and sun

Light, Norly.
22 29.400 29.410 51 46 Showers

Fine

Light, Norly.
23 29. 155 28.970 46 35.5 Cloudy

Fine

Sthrly, light
24 29.000 28.930 46 37 Hail, snow, and wind Fine

$. w. strng.
25 28.490 28.640 45
Snow showers

S. W., strng
26 28.720 28.980 42 34.5 Snow, and son

Fine

N. W., bois.
27 29.000
28 Ground cov'd with snow | Fine

Westerly
28 28.235 28.620 39.5 33

Heavy rain

Heavy rain

N. W., strog
29 29.030 29.100 45 32 Cloudy, rain p. m.

N. W.
30 28.900 28.850 51 39 Rain, ciouds

Rain

S. W., bois.
31 | 29.200 29.3751 47 39 Very windy

Showery Wstrly. bois.
Mean Max. 47.3 37.0 Mean. Min,

Fine

APRIL.

54

1836 Barometer. Thermometer April Morn. Even. Max. Min.

1 29 125 28.800 43 34 2 28.905 29.270

30.5 3 29.410 29.710 46.5 29 4 29.770 29 690 51.5 31 5 29 500 29.245 48 33 6 29.240 29.030 49 40 728 640 28 360 50 37 8 28 390 28-590 40 35 9 28.710 28 810 45 10 28 970 29 065 48 lu 29 090 29.100 12 29.080 29 160) 54 39 13 29 140 29 220 55 14 29315 29.440 57 40 15 29.515 29.515 59 50 16 29 505 29 505 57 47 17 29.510 29.505 57 43 18 29 455 29.460

40.5 19 29.430 29.365 54 40 20 29.260 29 160 52 45 21 29 250 30 110 52.5

37 22 29.005 29.245 56 23 29 185 29 (05 53 5 40 24 29 035 29 380 45 35 25 29.490 29.505 55.5 32 26 29.490 29.190 54.5 40 27 29 220 29 370 47 32 5 28 29 285 29.265 52 29 29.290 29 195 45 32 30 29.145 29.145 50 28

Remarks
Day.

Night
Snow, the whole day
Snow and rain
Fine, sun, clouds
Fine, sun

Fine
Light showers, fine Fine
Showery

Rain
Clouds, sun, rain p. m. Rain
Rain and snow

Heavy rain
Heavy showers Showers
Cloudy and sun

Rain
Fine, all sun

Fine
Cloudy, fine
Cloudy, showers a. m.
Cloudy, sun p. m.
Fine, sun, clouds Fine
Fine, cloudy

Fine
Cloudy

Cloudy
Five

Fine
Cloudy, light rain p.m. Fine
Strong wind, rain p. m. Cloudy, fine
Cloudy

Light rain
Fine, sun

Rain
Showers, hail

Fine
Rain

Rain
Fine, all sun

Fine
Cloudy, hail & rain p m. Fine
Clouds, showers, sun Fine
Fine, shower

Fine
Light snow showers

Fine
Clouds and sun

Very clear

Wind.
Sontherly
Westerly
Norly., high
Norly., light
S. W.
Norly., light
Westerly
Northerly
Northerly
Northerly
Nortberly
S. W.
8. W
Southerly
Northerig
Sonthly clo.
NE
Westerly
Westerly
S. W , strong
Westerly
Westerly
Westerly
Northerly
Northerly
Nortberg
Northerly
N. W.
N. W.
Northerly

53

33

[blocks in formation]

40

All sun

All sun

1636 Barometer, Thermometer.

Remarks. May Morn. Even. / Max. Mio.

Day.

Night. 129.205 29.345 48,5 33 Sun, clouds

Fine, clear 2 29.380 | 29.505 51 34 Windy, sun, cloud Fine, clear 3

29.300 52 32 Windy, sun, cloud Fine, cleap 4 29. 130 29.120 51 38.5 Cloudy, shower Cloudy 5 29. 105 29.285 49

38

Clouds, heavy sbowers Fine 6 29,450 29.640 54

Cloudy, showers

Rain 7 29.650 29.650 56 35.5 Allsun

Fine 8 29.650 29.645 69 39

Fine, clouds 9 29.630 29.600 58 39

All sun

Fine lo 29.600 29.550

56 38
All sun

Fine, clear 11 29.520 29.515 67 44 All sun

Fine, clear 12 29.030 29.625 64.5 43 All sun

Fine, clear 13 29.700 29.800 65 40

Fine, clear 14 24.910 29.920 66 44 Sun, few clonds Fine, clear 15 29.920 29.905

45 Sun, few clouds, eclipse Fine 16 29.906 29.890 65 47

All sun

Fine, clear 17 29.890 29.800

45
All sun

Fine, clear
18 29.710 29.660
73 61.5 Sun, few clouds

Fine clear 19 29,640 29.510 60

Fine 20 29.415 29.3:20 48 Sun, cloudy

Fine, clear 21 29.3.56 29.360 64 49 Mostly all sun

Fine 22 29.305 29.220 38 42

All sun

Fime 23

29.30 53 40.5 Cloudy, slight shower Cloudy 24 29.475 29.590 55 42.5 All sun

Cloudy 25 29.605 29.610 58 39.5 All sun, cold wind Fine, clear 20 29.660 29.700 57 41 Fine

Fine, clear 27 29.725 29.705 60 38 All sun

Fine, clear 28 29.720 29.705 61.5 42

All sun

Fine, clear 29 29.705 29.700 61 46

All sun

Fine, clouds 30 29,655 29 540 61 5 45

All sun

Fine, clear 31/ 29.450 | 29 345 GO

Fine, clear
Mean Max. 59.5 41.5 Mean. Min.

Wind,
Northerly
N. fresh
N. fresh
N. E, fresh
N. Els
N. Ely.
N. N. E.
N. Ely.
N. Ely.
N. Ely
Westerly
Variable
Northerly
Northerly
Northerly
Northerly
Northerly
N. Bly.
Northerly
Northerly
N. Ely:
Easterly
Easterly
East, fresh
E sterly
Easterly
Calm, vble.
Easterly
Easterly
Easteris
N.E.

70.5

All sun

68.5

45

All sun

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