The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare, Bände 14-15

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Seite 115 - Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least : Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee...
Seite 138 - That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. In me thou see'st the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west; Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.
Seite 29 - Neither a borrower nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all, — to thine own self be true; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Seite 168 - Past reason hated, as a swallow'd bait, On purpose laid to make the taker mad : Mad in pursuit, and in possession so ; Had, having, and in quest to have, extreme ; A bliss in proof, and proved, a very woe; Before, a joy proposed ; behind, a dream. All this the world well knows ; yet none knows well To shun the heaven that leads men to this hell. cixx. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun ; Coral is far more red than her lips...
Seite 33 - So, oft it chances in particular men, That for some vicious mole of nature in them, As, in their birth, wherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin, By the o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason, Or by some habit that too much o'er-leavens The form of plausive manners ; that these men, Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect, Being nature's livery, or fortune's star, Their virtues else, be they as pure as grace, As infinite as man may...
Seite 73 - I know my course. The spirit that I have seen May be the devil; and the devil hath power To assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps Out of my weakness and my melancholy, As he is very potent with such spirits, Abuses me to damn me.
Seite 63 - I have of late— but wherefore I know not— lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.
Seite 150 - They that have power to hurt and will do none, That do not do the thing they most do show, Who, moving others, are themselves as stone, Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow; They rightly do inherit Heaven's graces, And husband nature's riches from expense; They are the lords and owners of their faces, Others but stewards of their excellence.
Seite 20 - Nor the dejected havior of the visage. Together with all forms, modes, shows of grief. That can denote me truly : these, indeed, seem. For they are actions that a man might play : But I have that within, which passeth show ; These, but the trappings and the suits of woe.
Seite 61 - O God, I could be bounded in a nut-shell, and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.

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