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All these possess'd, are nought, but as they are The proof, the substance of an inward passion, And the rich plunder of a taken heart. Leon. I pray, my lord, no more. Car. Must I despair then? Do not shake me thus: Heav’ns ! what a proof I gave but two nights past Of matchless love . To fling me at thy feet, I slighted friendship, and I flew from fame; Nor heard the summons of the next day's battle: But, darting headlong to thy arms, I left The promised fight, I left Alonzo too, To stand the war, and quell a world alone. [Drums and Trumpett Leon. The victor comes. My lord, I must with draw. Car. And must you go? Leon. Why should you wish me stay 2 Your friend’s arrival will bring comfort to you, My presence none; it pains you and myself; For both our sakes, permit me to withdraw, [Erit. |Flourish of Drums and Trumpets

Enter Don Alonzo, with ATTENDANTs.

Car. Alonzo Alon. Carlos l—I am whole again; Clasp'd in thy arms, it makes my heart entire. Car. Whom dare I thus embrace : The conqueror Of Afric 2 Alon. Yes, much more—Don Carlos’ friend. The conquest of the world would cost me dear, Should it beget one thought of distance in thee. , I rise in virtues to come nearer to thee. *Twas Carlos conquer’d, 'twas his cruel chains Inflamed me to a rage unknown till then, And threw my former actions far behind. Car, I love fair Leonora. How I love her!

Yet still I find (I know not how it is)
Another heart, another soul for thee.
Thy friendship warms, it raises, it transports
Like music, pure the joy, without allay,
Whose very rapture is tranquillity:
But love, like wine, gives a tumultuous bliss,
Heighten’d indeed beyond all mortal pleasures;
But mingles pangs and madness in the bowl.

Enter ZANGA.

Zan. Manuel, my lord, returning from the port On business both of moment and of haste, Humbly begs leave to speak in private with you. Car. In private l—Ha!—Alonzo, I’ll return; No business can detain me long from thee. [Exit. Zan. My lord Alonzo, I obey'd your orders. Alon. Will the fair Leonora pass this way ? Zan. She will, my lord, and soon. Alon. Come near me, Zanga; For I dare open all my heart to thee. Never was such a day of triumph known There’s not a wounded captive in my train, That slowly follow'd my proud chariot wheels, With half a life, and beggary, and chains, But is a god to me: I am most wretched.— In his captivity, thou know'st, Don Carlos, My friend, (and never was a friend more dear) Deputed me his advocate in love: What did I do 2 I loved myself. Indeed, One thing there is might lessen my offence, (If such offence admits of being lessen’d) l thought him dead; for (by what fate I know not) His letters never reach'd me. Zan. Thanks to Zanga, Who thence contrived that evil which has happen'd. [Aside. Alon. Yes, cursed of Heaven! I loved, myself; and now,

In a late action, rescued from the Moors,
I have brought home my rival in my friend.

Zan. We hear, my lord, that in that action too
Your interposing arm preserved his life.
Alon. It did with more than the expense of

mine;
For, O, this day is mention'd for their nuptials.

Zan. My lord, she comes.
Alon. I'll take my leave and die.

[Exit. Zan. Hadsthou a thousand lives, thy death would

please me Unhappy fate! My country overcome! My six years hope of vengeance quite expired ! Wouid nature were _I will not fall alone: But others' groans shall tell the world my death.

[ Aside, and excite Enter LEONORA and ALONZO. Alon. When nature ends with anguish like to this, Sinners shall take their last leave of the sun, And wid his light adieu.

[Weeps. Léon. The mighty conqueror Dismay'd! I thought you gave the foe your sorrows.

Alon. O, cruel insult! are those tears your sporty Which nothing but a love for you could draw? Afric i quell'd, in hope by that to purchase Your leave to sigh unscorn'd; but I complain not; 'Twas but a world, and you are-Leonora.

Leon. That passion which you boast of is your

guilt,

A treason to your friend.

Álon. 0, Leonora!
What could I do? - In duty to my friend,
I saw you, and to see is to admire.
For Carlos did I plead, and most sincerely.
You know I did. I sought but your esteem;
If that is guilt, an angel had been guilty,

Leon. If, from your guilt, none suffer'd but your.

self, It might be so Farewell.

[Going. Alon. Who suffers with me? [Takes her hand. Leon. Enjoy your ignorance, and let me go.

[Weeps. Alon. What mean these tears ? Leon. I weep by chance; nor have my tears a

meaning. But, 0, when first I saw Alonzo's tears, I knew their meaning well!

Alon. Heavens! what is this?

Leon. Alonzo, pardon me the injury
Of loving you. I struggled with my passion,
And struggled long : let that be some excuse.
You well may wonder at such words as these ;
I start at them myself, they fright my nature.
Great is my fault; but blame me not alone;
Give him a little blame, who took such pains

To make me guilty. · Alon. Blame you ! you know I think your love a

blessing
Beyond all human blessings ! 'tis the price
Of sighs and groans, and a whole year of dying.
But, 0, the curse of curses ! O, my friend!

Leon. Alas!
Alon. What says my love ? Speak, Leonora.

Leon. Was it for you, my lord, to be so quick
In finding out objections to our love?
Think you so strong my love, or weak my virtue,
It was unsafe to leave that part to me?
Alon. Is not the day then fixed for your espou.

sals ? Leon. Indeed my father once had thought that

way; But marking how the marriage pain’d my heart, Long he stood doubtful ; but at last resolved,

Ba

In a late action, rescued from the Moors,
I have brought home my rival in my friend.
Zan. We hear, my lord, that in that action too
Your interposing arm preserved his life.
Alon. It did—with more than the expense of
- mine ;
For, O, this day is mention'd for their nuptials.
Zan. My lord, she comes.
Alon. I’ll take my leave and die. [Exit.
Zan. Hadst hou a thousand lives, thy death would
please me.
Unhappy fate : My country overcome!
My six years hope of vengeance quite expired —
Would nature were—I will not fall alone:
But others’ groans shall tell the world my death.
[Aside, and exit.

Enter LEONorA and ALONzo.

Alon. When nature ends with anguish like to this, Sinners shall take their last leave of the sun, And soid his light adieu. [Weeps.

Léon. The mighty conqueror Bismay’d I thought you gave the foe your sorrows.

Alon. O, cruel insult! are those tears your sport, Which nothing but a love for you could draw: Afric I quell’d, in hope by that to purchase Your leave to sigh unscorn’d; but I complain not; *Twas but a world, and you are—Leonora.

Leon. That passion which you boast of is your

'uilt,

A wo to your friend.

Alon. O, Leonora!
What could I do 2–In duty to my friend,
I saw you : and to see is to admire,
For Carlos did I plead, and most sincerely.
You know I did. I sought but your esteem;
If that is guilt, an angel had been guilty.

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