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with Abraham will I remember; and I will remember the land.” It appears from this divine declaration, that humility is occasioned by guilt, and consists in self-abasement, or the voluntary accepting of the punishment due to sin. To such a spirit God always brings sinners, when he renews their hearts and prepares them for mercy. The prophet speaking of a time of general reformation says, "The lofty looks of man shall be humbled, and the haughtiness of men shall be bowed down, and the Lord alone shall be exalted in that day.” These representations of humility may be illustrated, by various examples recorded in the Old and New Testament. Jacob felt that humility, which consists in self-abasement, when he said unto God, “I am not worthy of the least of all the mercies, and of all the truth, which thou hast shewed unto thy servant.”

David exercised that humility, which consists in self-abasement, under a sense of what he had deserved at the hand of God for numbering the people. When he saw the angel of the Lord brandishing his sword over Jerusalem, he humbly said unto God, “Is it not I that commanded the people to be numbered? even I it is that have sinned; but as for these sheep what have they done? Let thine hand, I pray thee, O Lord my God, be on me, and on my father's house." This was real and deep humiliation for sin. It was volun. tary sinking down as low as God should please to abase him. Job felt and expressed the same self-abasing spirit under the chastizing hand of God. In the depth of his complicated afflictions he said, “Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither. The Lord gave; and the Lord hath taken away: blessed be the name of the Lord.” And when he was reproached for such self-abasement, he

pertinently replied, “Shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?” This shows, that his humiliation flowed from a sense of guilt and unworthiness in the sight of God. Our Saviour himself set up the publican's prayer as a proper example of that humility, which becomes a sinner, and which will always meet the divine approbation. While the Pharisee boasted of his innocence and goodness, the Publican confessed his guilt, and humbly cried, “God be merciful to me a sinner.” This man was accepted, and the other rejected. This man was willing to abase himself, but the other exalted himself. This man was humble, but the other was proud and selfrighteous. The prodigal son, when he came to himself, felt the spirit and spoke the language of real humility. He said to himself, “I wi!l arise, and go to my father, and will say unto him, I have sinned against heaven and before thee, and I am no more worthy to be called thy son, make me as one of thy hired servants.” He freely confessed, that he had sinned, that he had sunk his character, that he had degraded himself below the rank of a son, and therefore declared that he was willing to take the low and igno. ble place of a servant. Paul was a very humble man, , and his humility consisted in self-abasement for sin. Once he says, “He is less than the least of all saints;" by which he meant, that he was the most guilty and ill-deserving in the sight of God. So he explains this seeming paradox in another passage. "For I am the least of all the apostles, that am not meet to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which was bestowed upon me was not in vain; but I laboured more abundantly than they all.” Here it is very evident, that Paul's humility did not arise

from ignorance of his own superior talents and servicos. He does not pretend, that he had less knowledge, or less grace, than the other apostles; but only that he had more guilt, because he persecuted the followers of Christ. And on this account, he was undoubtedly the most guilty and unworthy of all the apostles, and pught to lie the lowest before God, which he has done, and will do to all eternity. Having shown what it is for sinners to humble themselves before God, I proceed to show,

II. That they must do this, in order to obtain pardoning mercy.

Our Saviour declares, that “he that humbleth himself shall be exalted,” meaning that none but such as humble themselves shall obtain pardon and aeceptance in the sight of God. For he says in the conclusion of the parable, “This man,” meaning the humble publican,“ went down to his house justified,” pardoned and accepted, “rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted." The whole curs rent of Scripture teaches sinners, that they must humble themselves before God, in order to find favour in his sight. The apostle says to them, “Humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt

you in due time.” David declares, “The Lord is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and such as be of a contrite spirit. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.” And “thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is holy; 1 dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones.” There is a propriety, and

pertinently replied, “Shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?”. This shows, that his humiliation flowed from a sense of guilt and unworthiness in the sight of God. Our Saviour himself set up the publican's prayer as a proper example of that humility, which becomes a sinner, and which will always meet the divine approbation. While the Pharisee boasted of his innocence and goodness, the Publican confessed his guilt, and humbly cried, “God be merciful to me a sinner.” This man was accepted, and the other rejected. This man was willing to abase himself, but the other exalted himself. This man was humble, but the other was proud and selfrighteous. The prodigal son, when he came to himself, felt the spirit and spoke the language of real humility. He said to himself, “I will arise, and go to: my father, and will say unto him, I have sinned against heaven and before thee, and I am no more worthy to be called thy son, make me as one of thy hired servants.” He freely confessed, that he had sinned, that he had sunk his character, that he had degraded himself below the rank of a son, and therefore declared, that he was willing to take the low and ignoble place of a servant. Paul was a very humble man, and his humility consisted in self-abasement for sin. Once he says, “He is less than the least of all saints;" by which he meant, that he was the most guilty and ill-deserving in the sight of God. So he explains this seeming paradox in another passage. “For I am the least of all the apostles, that am not meet to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. But by the grace of God I am what I am: and his grace which was bestowed upon me was not in vain; but I laboured more abundantly than they all.” Here it is very evident, that Paul's humility did not arise

from ignorance of his own superior talents and servicos. He does not pretend, that he had less knowledge, or less grace, than the other apostles; but only that he had more guilt, because he persecuted the followers of Christ. And on this account, he was undoubtedly the most guilty and unworthy of all the apostles, and ought to lie the lowest before God, which he has done, and will do to all eternity. Having shown what it is for sinners to humble themselves before God, I proceed to show,

II. That they must do this, in order to obtain pardoning mercy,

Our Saviour declares, that "he that humbleth himself shall be exalted,” meaning that none but such as humble themselves shall obtain pardon and aeceptance in the sight of God. For he says in the conclusion of the parable, “This man,” meaning the humble publican, “ went down to his house justified,” pardoned and accepted, “rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted." The whole curs rent of Scripture teaches sinners, that they must humble themselves before God, in order to find favour in his sight. The apostle says to them, “Humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in due time.” David declares, “The Lord is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and such as be of a contrite spirit. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.” And “thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is holy; I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones.” There is a propriety, and

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