The Principles of Civil Government Familiarly Illustrated: Including a Comprehensive View of the Government of the State of Vermont, and an Abstract of the Laws Showing the Rights, Duties, and Responsibilities of Citizens in the Civil and Domestic Relations, with an Outline of the Government of the United States : Adapted to the Capacities of Children and Youth, and Designed for the Use of Families and Schools

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Stoddard & Babcock, 1848 - 287 Seiten
 

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Seite 221 - Such an attachment of a small or weak, towards a great and powerful nation, dooms the former to be the satellite of the latter. Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, (I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens,) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and
Seite 249 - ARTICLE 1. THAT all men are born equally free and independent and have certain natural, inherent, and unalienable rights, amongst which are the enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety : therefore, no male
Seite 217 - of parties in the state, with particular reference to the founding of them upon geographical discriminations. Let me now take a more comprehensive view, and warn you, in the most solemn manner, against the baneful effects of the spirit of party generally. This spirit, unfortunately, is inseparable from our nature, having its root in the strongest passions of
Seite 223 - alliances for extraordinary emergencies. Harmony, and a liberal intercourse with all nations, are recommended by policy, humanity, and interest. But even our commercial policy should hold an equal and impartial hand ; neither seeking nor granting exclusive favors or preferences ; consulting the natural course of things ; diffusing and diversifying by gentle
Seite 140 - the truth may be given in evidence to the jury, and if the matter charged as libelous is true, and was published with good motives and for justifiable ends, the party shall be acquitted." In the state of Vermont, however, and perhaps a few other states, if the party prosecuted proves the truth of his
Seite 218 - which the constitution designates. But let there be no change by usurpation, for though this, in one instance, may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free governments are destroyed. The precedent must always greatly overbalance, in permanent evil, any partial or transient benefit which the use can at any time yield. WASHINGTON'S FAREWELL ADDRESS.
Seite 223 - the stream of commerce, but forcing nothing ; establishing, with powers so disposed in order to give trade a stable course, to define the rights of our merchants, and to enable the government to support them, conventional rules of intercourse, the best that present circumstances and natural opinion will permit,
Seite 214 - the executive, and in the unanimous ratification by the senate of the treaty with Spain, and in the universal satisfaction at that event throughout the United States, a decisive proof how unfounded were the suspicions propagated among them of a policy in the general government, and in the Atlantic states, unfriendly to their
Seite 209 - Here, perhaps, I ought to stop. But a solicitude for your welfare, which cannot end but with my life, and the apprehension of danger, natural to that solicitude, urge me, on an occasion like the present, to offer to your solemn contemplation, and to recommend to your frequent review,
Seite 209 - the more freedom, as you can only see in them the disinterested warnings of a parting friend, who can possibly have no personal motive to bias his counsel. Nor can I forget, as an encouragement to it, your indulgent reception of my sentiments on a former and not dissimilar occasion.

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