Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Chamberlayne, reverend Mr. iv. 262.
Chambers, Catharine, i. 262, n.; ii. 37.

Ephraim, his proposal for his dictionary (probably for the second
edition of it) and sir W. Temple's writings contributed to form Johnson's
style, i. 162, 163.

sir Robert, ii. 224. 227.
Johnson's letter to him, i. 208.

sir William, iv. 168.—Heroick Epistle to him approved by Johnson,
iv. 98.
Chamier, Anthony, esq. i. 376; iii. 225.
Chapone, Mrs. i. 147.

Johnson's letter to, iv. 223.
Characters, the first instance of their delineation, in the first book of Xenophon's

Retreat of the ten thousand, iv. 25.
Charade, Johnson's, on Dr. Barnard, lord bishop of Limerick, iv. 173.
Charlemont, James, first earl of, iv. 71, 72.
Charles the first, ii. 321.

the second, ii. 297. } Johnson's opinion of,
the fifth, his

celebration of his funeral obsequies in his lifetime, iii. 220.
Chastity, ii. 399. See Marriage.
Chatham, William Pitt, earl of, iv. 287.
Chatterton's Poems, iii. 40, 41.
Chesterfield, lord, i. 132. 194. 200, 201; ii. 182. 288; iii. 313. 343; iv. 156.
299.
his Letters, i. 201. and n.; ii. 288.

might be made a very pretty book, iii. 42.
Johnson's severe letter to him, i. 197,
Cheyne's English Malady, iii. 22. 73.
Cheynel, Johnson's Life of, i. 170.
Children, i. 18. 352; ii. 79 ; iii. 23. 114. See Education.

always cruel, i. 341.
Cholmondeley, hon. Mrs. iii. 233. 283.

George James, esq. iv. 310.
Christian, rev. Mr. his solution of a strange fact at St. Kilda, ii. 44.
Christian religion, evidence of, i. 304. 335. 354. 364; ii. 169. 281.
Churchill's poetry, i. 327.
Churton, reverend Mr. Ralph, his excellent remarks, iv. 192, n. 273, n.
Chymistry, iv. 214.
Cibber, Colley, i. 103. 126, n. 314; ii. 73. 297 ; iii. 24. 165; iv. 219. See
George the second.

Theophilus, his Lives of the Poets, i. 135; is. 24, 25.
Clarendon, Edward, earl of, continuation of his History, ii. 372.

his style, iïi. 230.

commendation of, ii. 65.
Claret, its inefficacy as wine, iii. 338.
Clarke, Richard, esq. iv. 234.

reverend Dr. his Works, iv. 380.
Clenard, Nicholas, his Greek Grammar, not much read by scholars in England,
iv, 15.

his Latin Account of his Travels, iv. 15, n.
Cleone, Dodsley's, i. 251; iv. 16.
Cleonice, Hoole's, ii. 253.
Clergy, the, ii. 101. 147, 148. 207. etc.; ii. 124. 271. 279; iv. 78. 165.
Clergyman, advice to a young one, iii. 387.
Clerk, sir, P. J. iv. 73.
Climate, contributes little to happiness, ii. 166.
Clive, lord, iïi. 354.

Mrs. the actress, iv. 6. 219.
Club, Essex-head, iv, 229, 230, 231.

Eumelian, iv. 361.

Club, Literary. See Literary.
Coachmakers' hall debating society, iv. 82.
Cobb, Mrs. iii. 364.
Cock-lane ghost, i. 318; iii. 238.
Colchester, i. 366.
Collections in writing, their use,

ii. 73.
College tutor, an old one's advice to one of his pupils, relative to composition,

ii. 203.
Collins, the poet, i. 299.
Colman, George, esq. i. 153, n.; ii. 279. 293; iii. 81; iv. 7.

his Letter from Lexiphanes, iv. 355.
Combabus, iii. 213, n.
Commandment, the ninth, i. 120.
Compton, the rev. James, an account of his conversion from the Roman catho-
lick to the protestant faith, iv. 187, n.

Johnson's letter in his favour, and to him, iv. 188, n.
Condescension, iii. 2.
Confession, auricular, ii. 84; jii. 49.
Congé d'élire, iv. 292.
Congreve, his Works, ii. 68. 76; iii. 168.

Johnson's Life of, iv. 49.

rev. Mr. i. 18; ii. 402. 415.
Connoisseur, the, i. 328.
O'Connor, Charles, esq. his account of Ireland, i. 246.

Johnson's letter to, iii. 97.
Const, Francis, esq. ; iii. 13, n.
Controversial writings, ii. 388; iii. 9.
Convents, ii. 7.
Conversation, ii. 221. 389. 393; iii, 44, 45. 166. 301; iv. 165, 166, 167. 213.

solid, disagreeable to men of moderate capacity, because they are
left out of company by it, iii. 45.
Converts, ii. 85.
Convocation, the, of the clergy, i. 364.
Cook, captain, iii. 6.
Cooper, John Gilbert, esq. ii. 106; iii. 135, n.; iv. 3.
Coriat, Tom, ii. 149.
Cork and Orrery, John, earl of, ii. 106; iii. 165. 214. 223. 279; iv. 31. 156.
Corn laws of Ireland, ii. 108.
Corsica, account of, ii. 8.58. 65.
Cotterell, Misses, i. 183.
Country gentlemen, ii. 165.

should visit London with their wives, to acquire topics of
conversation, iii. 161.
Country life, iii. 226.
Courtship of great men, how far allowable, ii. 7; iii. 170.
Courtenay, John, esq. his poem on Johnson's character, i. 32. 164. 242. 268 ;

ii. 231; iv. 349, n.
Coverley, sir Roger de, ii. 322.
Cowley, Johnson's Life of, iii. 23; iv. 31.

the edition of his select works by bishop Hurd, iii. 23. 203.
Coxeter, Thomas, esq. his great collection of English poetry, iii. 142.

the Lives of the Poets, by Shields and Cibber, compiled from his ma-
nuscripts, iii. 142, n.
Crabbe, rev. Mr. his Village, iv. 157.
Craddock, Joseph, esq. iii. 31.
Crashaw, the poet, a Latin epigram of his erroneously attributed to Dryden,

ji. 271, n.
Craven, lady, (now margravine of Anspach,) iii. 17.
Croft, rev. Herbert, iv. 271. 280.

his Life of Young, iv. 52, 53.
VOL. IV.

Dd

Cromwell, the usurper, Johnson's design of writing his life, iv. 212.
Crosbie, sir Andrew, ii. 327.
Crouch, Mrs, the actress, iv. 203.
Crousaz, i. 94. 111.
Cruikshank, Mr. Johnson's letter to, iv. 331.335.
Cullen, Dr. iv. 240.
Cumberland, Richard, esq. iii. 35; iv. 58. 352.
Curates, the question of raising their salaries discussed, iii. 124.
Dalrymple, sir John, his Memoirs, ii. 181.

David. See Hailes, lord.
Dalzel, Mr. professor of Greek at Edinburgh, iv. 352.
Damhouderius, his Praxis Rerum Criminalium, i. 79, n.
Dartineuf, ii. 392.
Davies, Mr. Thomas, character and anecdotes of, i. 305, 306, 307; ii. 52, 53,
54. 74, 75, n. 233. 300. 304; iii. 30. 201. 222 ; iv. 6. 207.

Johnson's kind letters to, iv. 207. 332.

his Memoirs of Garrick, üi. 385.
Dawkins,

-, esq. the traveller, iv. 110.
Deane's Future Life of Brutes, ii. 45.
Death, reflections on, i. 259; ii. 85 ; iii. 263, 277; iv. 254, 255. 272. See

Johnson.
Debts, contracting them, the source of much evil and calamity, iv. 136. 139.
Dedications, prefaces, introductions, etc. by Johnson, and remarks on, i.

113. 126. 131. 138. 193. 243. 269. 286. 300; ii. 1. 22. 38. 176, 177. 193.

254 ; iii. 91. 98.
Defoe, Daniel, iii. 238.
Delany's observation on Swift, iii. 223.
Dempster, George, esq. i. 319. 339. 341; ii. 266.
Dennis, John, his critical works worth collecting, iii. 32.
Derby, some particulars relating to, iii. 146.
Derrick, Samuel, esq. i. 301. 308. 355, 356 ; iii. 330; iv. 171. 207, n.
Desmoulins, Mrs. i. 34. 176; iii. 200; iv. 382.

evaynes, John, esq. iv. 250.
Devil, the first whig, iii. 289.

his influence upon the souls of men, iv. 265, n.
Devonshire, duke of, iii. 167. 335.

- duchess of, iv. 321.
Diamond, Mr. i. 179.
Dibdin, Mr. ii. 89.
Dick, sir Alexander, letters of, iii. 86. 114 ; iv. 237.

Johnson's praise of his liberality as a Scotchman, iii. 114.
Dictionary of the English Language, Johnson's, i. 131, 132, 133, 134. 346, etc.;
ii. 132. 175. 177 ; iii. 100; iv. 3.

first published, i. 225.
Johnson's epitome of, i. 235.
Garrick's epigram on, i. 231.

Mr. Harris of Salisbury's praise of, iii. 100.
Dilly, Messrs. iii. 54. 95; iv. 102. 115.

Johnson's letters to, iii. 111. 349; iv. 233.
Diomed, his father's noble exhortation to him in the Iliad, ii. 107.
Distressed Mother, Johnson's Epilogue to, i. 28.
Dixie, sir Wolstan, bart. i. 49.
Dodd, reverend Dr. iii. 105. 125, 126, 127. 138. 149, 150.240. 250.
- Johnson's assistance to him, iii. 126-130.

opinion concerning him, iv, 185.

letters to him, iii. 130. 133.
Dodington, George Bubb, esq. (afterwards lord Melcombe,) i. 160, n.;

iv. 53, n.
Dodsley, Robert, i. 83. 200, 201, 221, n.; ii. 391 ; iii. 30; iv. 15.
Dogs, do not compare, ii. 75.

Dominicetti's baths, ii. 78.
Donne's vision, ii. 391.
Dossie, Mr. iv. 8.
Douglas, right reverend Dr. (sord bishop of Salisbury,) i. 85. 170. 197. 318 ;
ii. 52; iv. 253.

Dr. his collection of the various editions of Horace, iv. 255.

cause, ii. 42. 198.
Drake, sir Francis, Johnson's Life of, i. 102. 104.
Draughts, game of, i. 243.
Dreams, iv. 4.
Drelincourt on death, ii. 139.
Drumgould, colonel, ii. 352.
Drummond, Mr. William, Johnson's letters to, ii. 24. 26. 28.

Dr. iii. 74.
Drunkenness. See Wine.
Dryden, Johnson's Life of, ii. 143; iii. 60; iv. 31. 36.

compared with Pope, ii. 3. 68.
has sometimes a profundity which Pope could never reach, ii. 68.
his style easily distinguished from that of others, iii. 250.
his description of life, iv. 275.
his character at Will's Coffee-house, iii. 60.
his lines on royal patronage, ii. 192.
his prologues, ii. 284.

puzzled himself about predestination, iii. 309.
Duelling, ii. 153. 194; iv. 191.
Du Halde's Account of China, ii. 46.
Dunbar, Dr. iii. 386.
Dunciad, Pope's, written primarily for fame, ii. 293.
Duncombe, William, esq. iii. 279.
Dundas, right hon. Henry, iii. 190.
Dunning, Mr. his high compliment to Johnson, iii. 215.
Dury, major-general Alexander, i. 259.
Dyer's ii. 396.
Dyer, Samuel, esq. i. 376; ii. 13; iv. 8.
Easter, ii. 238.
Eccles, rev. Mr. i. 281, n.

-, esq. i. 331.

269;

Economy, petty, hardly worth while, ii. 108; iv. 170.
Edinburgh Royal Society Transactions, absurd criticism on Johnson-in, iv. 20, n.
Education, i. 57. 352. 357; ii. 5. 356. 384; iii. 10. 152. 318. 341; iv. 284.

Johnson of opinion, that we ought not to refine too much in the edu-
cation of our children, iii. 152.
Edwards, Thomas, esq. his Canons of Criticism, i. 199, n.

rev. Dr. (of Oxford,) Johnson's letter to, iii. 326.
Mr. (Johnson's fellow collegian,) anecdotes of, iii. iv. 80.

of New England, iii. 259.
Eglintoune, Alexander, earl of, ii. 55; iii. 169.
Egotism, iii. 154. 287. 373.
Eld, Mr. iii. 289.
Elibank, Patrick, lord, iii. 20. 45; iv. 8. 101.
Eliot, Edward, of Port Eliot, (first lord,) iv. 71. 299.
Elizabeth, queen of England, rate of her learning, iv. 10.
Ellis, Mr. John, iii. 17.
Elphinston, Mr. James, his edition of the Rambler, i, 154; ii. 194.

Johnson's letters to, i. 154. 156.
Elwal, the enthusiast, ii. 140.216.
Emigration, iji. 207.
Emmet, Mrs. the actress, ii. 406.
English poets, the selection of them for the general and collected edition of their

works, made by the booksellers, and not by Johnson, iii. 329.

Entails, ii. 360. 367.377, 378. 380.

Johnson's letters on, ii. 362, 363. 367. 369. 371.
Envy, ii. 36. 224; iii. 275.
Epilogue to the Distressed Mother, i. 28 ; iii. 37.
Episcopacy, iii. 330. See Bishops.
Epitaphs, i. 179, n.; ii. 356; iv. 192. 359.

-Johnson's Essay on, i. 102.
Erasmus, Johnson's opinion of his Ciceronianus, iv. 318.

a passage of his applied to Johnson, iv. 269, n.
Erskine, hon. Thomas, ii. 148.

Andrew, both a good poet and a good critick, iii, 136.
Essex Head club. See Club.
Eugenio, a poem, ii. 205.
Eumelian club. See Club.
European Magazine, i. 282, n.
Excise, Johnson's definition of, i. 228, n.
Execution of criminals, iv, 168.
Exhibition of paintings, i. 284.
Fable, sketch of one by Johnson, ii. 198, 199.
Falconer, rev. Mr. a Scotch nonjuring bishop, iii. 330.
False Alarm. See Johnson's Political Pamphlets.
Falkland's Islands, ii. 112, 113. 125.
Fame, i. 352; iii. 234, 235.
Families, old, respect due to them, ii. 130. 225.
Farmer, rev. Dr.-Johnson's letters to, ii. 92 ; iii. 378.
Farquhar, in Johnson's opinion, a poet of considerable merit, iv. 6.
Fasting, its effect on one of the fathers, ii. 383.
Favours unreasonable, i. 288, 289.
Felixmarte of Hircania, i. 21.
Females, succession of. See Entail ; Feudal System.
Ferguson, sir Adam, ii. 144.

James, the astronomer, ii. 78.
Feudal System, ii. 151. 174. 224. 364. 377. See Entails.
Fiction, real and original, a very small quantity of it in the world, iv. 212.
Fielding, Henry, i. 190, n.

compared with Richardson, ii. 41. 148.
-his Amelia read through by Johnson without stopping, iii. 39.

the whole impression sold in one day, iii. 35, n.
- sir John, iji. 379.

his death, iii. 379, n.
Sally, i. 190, n.
Fingal. See Ossian.
Fitzherbert, William, esq. iii. 134. 342; iv. 23.
Fitzosborne's Letters, iv. 249, n.
Flatman's Poems, iii. 24.
Fleet-street, i. 360; ï. 295. 376; iii. 268. See London.
Fleming, sir Michael le, i. 360, n.
Flexman, Mr. indexmaker, iv. 294.
Flint, Bet, iv. 90.
Flood, right hon. Henry, his hequest to Dublin university, i. 247, n.

- his opinion on the question whether Johnson would have excelled as a
speaker in parliament, ii. 116.

his sepulchral verses on Johnson, iv. 387.
Floyer, sir John, i. 17; iv. 243.

author of an excellent book on the asthma, iv. 243.
Fludyer, rev. Mr. ii. 390.
Foote, Samuel, anecdotes and character of, ii. 75, 76, 77. 85. 132. 185; iii. 58.

165. 235; iv. 201. 252.
Fop, a clerical one, only half a beau, iv. 69.
Foppery, never cured, ii. 106,

« ZurückWeiter »