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son, iv. 27.

Forbes, sir William, iii. 71. 185.
Ford, the rev. Cornelius, i. 21; ii. 310.
Fordyce, Dr. James, i. 309; iv. 377.
Forrester, colonel, iï. 17.
Forster's voyage to the South sea, iii. 162.
Forster, Mrs. Elizabeth, (Milton's granddaughter,) i. 169.
Fortune-hunters, ii. 110.
Fox, right hon. Charles James, iii. 233. 237; iv. 150. 267.
France, Johnson's visit to, ii. 333, 334.

his journal there, ii. 338, et seq.

the reason assigned why he did not print an account of his travels there,
iii. 267.

his opinions of that country, iii. 313.
Francis's Horace, iii. 316.
Franklin, rev. Dr. his translation of Lucian's Demonax, and dedication to John-

Benjamin, his definition of man, iii. 218.
French, Mrs. iv. 40.
French writers, superficial, and why, i. 354.

language, Johnson's knowledge of, ii. 66. 363.

their manners and writings, ii. 103; iii. 313; iv, 11. 214.
Frenchmen use big words for little matters, i. 369.

in general know no more than women, iii. 226.
their literature, iii. 226.

a gross ill-bred people, iii. 313; iv. 214.
Frederick the third, king of Prussia, Johnson's Life of, i. 236.
Friends, and friendship, i. 182, 183, 229, 230; ii. 154; iii. 127. 342. 371. 389,
390; iv. 5.

whether there are any probable grounds for supposing that they shall
know one another in a future state, ii. 138; iii. 277.
Friendship, departed, i. 156; iii. 123. 277.

one of its greatest pleasures, ii. 178.

may subsist between two persons who differ in opinion in some one
capital point, ii. 154.

an Ode, by Johnson, i. 112.
Frisick language, less cultivated than any of the northern dialects, i. 374.
Fullarton, colonel, iii. 316.
Future state of man, ii. 137; iii. 179. 257; iv. 192.

different degrees of happiness in heaven, ii. 6, n; iii. 257.
Gaming, ii. 149; iii. 19.
Ganganelli's Letters, iii. 256.
Gardiner, Mrs. i. 180; iii. 17; iv. 222. 369, n.
Garrick, David, esq. anecdotes of, i. 58. 61, 62, 130. 139. 141. 146, 147. 187.

203. 307; îi. 57. 64. 73. 194. 198. 200, 201. 285. 405, 406 ; iii. 41, 58, 59.
229, 230, 231, 232. 234, etc. 262, 342, 343, 344.

his Shakespeare Jubilee, ii. 57.

Johnson's opinion of him, i. 160. 311. 378; ii. 73. 108. 164. 194. 285.
327. 385. 406; iii. 28. 41, 58, 59. 165. 234. 277. 342, 343 ; iv. 3. 13. 219.

his death, iii. 330.
Peter, esq. i. 73 ; ii. 274, 404. 408; ii. 364.

Mrs. iv. 85.
Gastrell, Mrs. ii. 411; iii. 365.
Gaubius, professor at Leyden, his criterion of madness, i. 35.
General warrants, ii. 60.
Gay, the Orpheus of highwaymen, ii. 319, n.
Gentilhomme est toujours gentilhomme, i. 389.
Gentility, i. 338; ii. 297 ; iii. 258.

more virtues among the higher classes than among those of inferiour
ranks, iii. 314.
Gentleman's Magazine, i. 73, 74, etc.

Gentlewoman, one born so, always distinguishable, i. 108.
George the first, (king,) ii. 298.

the second, i. 101, 102, 153; ii. 298.
- the third, his accession and character, i. 274. 284. 291; ii. 38; iii. 380.

Johnson's interview with, ii. 31.
Ghosts, i. 317, 318; ii. 139. 152. 156; iii. 206. 264. 310. 349; iv. 82.
Gibbon, Edward, esq. ii. 56, n. 303. 318; iii. 218; iv. 66.

his imitation of Johnson's style, iv. 356.
Gibbons, Dr. iv. 110.
Gillespie, Dr. consulted on Dr. Johnson's case, iv. 238.

Johnson's praise of his opinion, iv. 238.
Gisborne, Dr. his anecdote of Mr. Fitzherbert, iii. 135, n.
Glow-worm, Johnson's fable of, ii. 199.

his Latin poem on, ii. 46.
Goldsmith, Dr. Oliver, character of, i. 319. 321, et seq.

anecdotes of, i. 158. 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326; ii. 36. 67, 68.
152. 154, 155, 156. 160. 167. 177. 180. 184, 185. 187. 191, 192. 198, 199,
200, 201, 202, 203. 205. 221, 222, 224; ii. 30; iv. 7. 22. 98. 157.

treated by Charles, the first lord Camden, as an ordinary man, iü.
276.

his death, ii. 242, n. 244.
Johnson's epitaphs on' him, iii. 67, 68, 69.
his bon mots on Johnson, ii. 55. 199, 200; iv. 98. 251.

Johnson's opinions of him and his works, i. 321; ii. 41. 142. 154.
167. 311; iii. 30. 150. 220. 224, 225. 241. 276. 284, 285. 333; iv. 18. 24.
Good-breeding, perfect,-in what it consists, ii, 67.
Good Friday, ii. 307. 310; iii. 267.
Gordon, lord George, iii. 379; iv. 77.
Gower, earl, his letter to Swift, in favour of Johnson, i. 89, 90.
Graham, lord, iii. 339; iv. 95.

Miss, (now lady Dashwood,) iii. 360.
Grainger, Dr. his Sugar Cane, ii, 396.

his Ode on Solitude, iii. 177.
Grammar school, Johnson's plan of, i. 62.
Granger, rev. Mr. his Biographical History, iii, 77.
Granville, John Carteret, earl, ii. 95, n.; anecdote of, iv. 9.
Grattan, Henry, esq. bis oratory censured, iv. 287.
Gray's poetry, i. 315; ii. 140. 286, 287. 293; iii. 25. 30; iv. 10.
Great men, not fond of Johnson's company, and why, iv. 101.
Greek, Johnson's knowledge of, iv. 351, 352.
Green, Mr. Richard, of Lichfield, his museum, iii. 364.

letter from Johnson to him, iv. 359.
Greenwich hospital, i. 359.
Grenville, right hon. George, ii. 113.
Greville, Fulke, esq. his Maxims, iv. 276.
Grierson, Mr. ii. 95.

Mrs. the learned, ii. 95, n.
Groot, de, a descendant of Grotius, iii. 110, 111, n.
Grotius, i. 354; iii. 111.
Grove, rev. Mr. iii. 27; iv. 26.
Guardian to children, instructions relative to the appointment of, ii. 354.
Gulosity, i. 367.
Gustavus Adolphus, Harte's Life of, iv. 71.
Guthrie, William, esq. i. 77; ii. 44; iv. 24.
Gwyn, Mr. the architect, ii. 385, 386.
Habeas corpus, ii. 60.
Habits, early, not conquerable without unrenitting exertion, ii. 318.
Hackman, rev. Mr. iii. 340.
Hailes, lord, (sir David Dalrymple, bart.) his and Johnson's opinion of each

other, i. 338. 352 ; ii. 358, 359.

Hailes, lord, his Annals of Scotland, ii. 241. 243. 246. 248. 257. 292. 330, 331.
335. 358, 359. 368, 369 ; iii. 46. 106. 320. 331. 357.

his opinion on entails, ii. 366.
Hale, lord chief justice, anecdote of, iv. 282.
Hales, venerable John, his works, iv, 286.
Hall, general, iii. 321.

Mrs. iv. 84.
-Dr. Joseph, bishop of Norwich ; his opinion concerning the different de-
grees of heavenly glory, ii. 6, n. ; iii. 257, n.
Hamilton, right hon. William Gerard, i. 386 ; iv. 384, n.

his kindness to Johnson, iv. 222.

- Johnson's letters to, iv. 222, 329.
Hamilton's Poems, iii. 136.
Hammond, James, author of the Elegies, iv. 13.
Hanway, Jonas, i. 237 ; ii. 101.
Happiness, ii. 6; iii. 42. 257, 258. See Life.

may be attained, if we apply our hearts to piety, i. 140.

the reasonable hope of a happy futurity the only solid basis of,
iii. 264.
Hardyknute, the ballad of, a modern fiction, ii. 72, n.
Harleian Miscellany, i. 126.
Harrington, Dr. his Nugæ Antiquæ, iv. 161.

Caroline, countess of, iii. 126.
Harris, James, esq. of Salisbury, ii. 193; iii. 100. 218. 229, 230.

his high praise of Johnson's Dictionary, iii. 100.

Thomas, esq. proprietor of Covent-garden theatre, iii. 99.
Harte's History of Gustavus Adolphus, ii. 99; iv. 71.
Harwood, rev. Dr. iii. 31.
Hastie. See Schoolmaster.
Hastings, Warren, esq. character of, iv. 58.

his letter to the author, iv. 58.

· Johnson's letters to, iv. 60. 62, 63.
Hawkesbury, lord, Johnson's letters to, ii. 131.

his lordship's high opinion of Johnson, iii. 132.
Hawkesworth, Dr. i. 137.

a successful imitator of Johnson, i. 173.

his Voyages, ii. 213,
Hawkins, sir John, i, 137.

- remarks on his Life of Johnson, i. 2. 149.

contradicted and corrected, i. 85, n. 97. 116, n. 149. 152, n. 171.
173. 178. 221, n. 237. 260, n. 324; ii. 28, n. 395, n.; iv. 296, n. 336, 337,
and n. 362. 366, n. 372, n.

rev. Thomas, poetry professor at Oxford, iii. 231.

Mr. Johnson's first instructor in Latin, i. 17.
Hay, lord Charles, iv. 18.
Heard, the word how to be pronounced, iii. 176.
Heaven, different degrees of happiness in, ii. 6, n.; iii. 257.

the question whether departed friendships formed on earth will be con-
tinued in a future state, discussed, ii. 137; ii. 277.
Heberden, Dr. iv. 205. 365,
Hebrides, Johnson's visit to, i. 351; ii. 43. 118. 127. 230.

the pleasantest journey he ever made, ii. 79.

-Johnson's Account of his Journey, ii. 254. 264. 280. 316; iii. 87, 124.
156. 268. 288.

commended by every body on various grounds, iii. 124. See Journey
to the Hebrides.
Hector, Mr. Edmund, i. 20. 26, n. 55. 112. 117.; ii. 398, 399; iv. 120. 247.
341.

Edmund, Johnson's letters to, iv. 130, 131. 344.
Verses on a Sprig of Myrtle, written by Johnson for him, i. 55.

Heely, Mr. and Mrs. ii. 28; iv. 337.
Hell, paved with good intentions, ii. 313.
Helmet, hung out formerly as a sign of hospitality, iii, 243.
Henderson, Mr. John, iv. 261, 262, n. 271.

the actor, ii. 286, n.; iv. 220, n.
Henry, the historian, should have confined' himself to the history of manners,

iii. 296.
Hermippus Redivivus, Campbell's, i. 326.
Heroick Epistle, iv. 98. 286.
Hervey, hon. Henry, i. 67.

hon. Thomas, ii. 29. 297.
Hicky, Mr. the painter, ii. 297.
Highwaymen, the question of shooting them discussed, iii. 214.
Higher classes, more virtue found among them, than in inferiour stations, iii.

314, 315.
Hill, Aaron, esq. his account of Irene, i. 144, n.

Dr. John, his works, ii. 34.
Hinchliffe, Dr. John, lord bishop of Peterborough, iii. 375, n.
History and historians, i. 332; ii. 65. 166. 189. 198. 202, 203. 317, 318; iii. 11.
296, 297.

great abilities not requisite for writing it, i. 332.

of Manchester, by Whitaker, for the most part a dream, iii. 296. See
Henry.

of the house of Yvery, praised, iv. 176.
Hobbes, his arguments to show that debility of mind is not necessarily incident

to old age, iii. 227, n.
Hogarth, i. 101.
Holidays, ii. 401.

none observed in Scotland, ii. 401.
Hollis, Thomas, esq. iv. 85.
Home, Mr. John, his parody on Derrick, i. 356.

his proposed history of the rising in 1745, iii. 146, n.
Homer, Johnson's translation from, i. 25.

critiques on, iii. 174. 293. 295; iv. 12.
Hoole, John, his Tasso, i. 300.

his Ariosto, iv. 63.
his Cleonice, ii. 253.
Johnson's letters to, ii. 253; iv. 324.
curious anecdote of, iv. 257.
his attention to Johnson, iv. 372. 376.

the rev. Mr. iv. 375.
Hope, life insupportable without; ii. 227, 228.

Dr. iv. 240.
Horace, Johnson's translations from, i. 24, 25.

his Odes cannot be perfectly translated, iii. 316.-The translation by
Dr. Francis commended, ibid.
Horne, rev. Dr. ii. 243. 390; iv. 390, n.

Mr. John. See Tooke.
Hospitality, iv. 14. 199.

promiscuous, does not procure lasting regard, ii. 142.

in London, ii. 191.
Houghton Gallery, iv. 300.
House of commons, iii. 361; iv. 67. 91.

how a counsel should address that assembly, iii. 201, 202
iv. 67.

of peers, iii. 308.
Howard, general sir George, ii. 326, n.

the hon. Edward, a celebrated couplet of his misquoted, ii. 87, n.
Hudibras, ii. 321; ii. 30.
Huggins, Mr. iv, 5.

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Hume, David, esq. his style French, i. 343.

his scepticism, i. 346, 347; ii. 388 ; iii, 137.
.. never read the New Testament with attention, ii, 6.

his disbelief of a future state, ii. 85.

his Life, iii. 104.
Humphry, Ozias, esq. iv. 245, 246.
Hunter, Mr., Johnson's schoolmaster, i. 17.

Miss, iv. 164, n.
Hurd, Dr. (lord bishop of Worcester,) i. 48; iii. 23. 62, n. 63, n. 203; iv. 169.

264.
Hussey, rev. Mr. John, iii. 328.

rev. Dr. Thomas, iv. 377.
Hutton, Mr. iv. 376.
Hutton's History of Derby, iii. 148, n.
Hypochondriack, i. 34.
Jackson, Henry, (one of Johnson's schoolfellows,) ii. 404 ; iii. 118.

Richard, the omniscient, iii. 15, n.
Jacobite, Johnson's ingenious defence of that character, i. 337.
James the second, his character, ii. 298.
James, Dr. Robert, his Medicinal Dictionary, i. 113; iii. 18.

his death, ii, 3.
January 30th, ii. 129.
Janus Vitalis, iii. 224.
Idea, the improper use of that word, iii. 176.
Idler, Johnson's, i. 253, 254.
Jenyns, Soame, his Origin of Evil, i. 241.

his Evidence of the Christian Religion, iii. 250. 258.
Impressions and internal impulses dangerous and deceitful, iv. 107.
Incidit in Scyllum, etc. traced to its source, iv. 163, n.
India, the government of, iv. 193.
Infidel, an odious character, iii. 43.

writers, how to be treated, ii. 388, 389.
Infidelity, ii. 312; iii. 43. 104 ; iv. 266.

conjugal, iii. 309. 359, 360.
Influence of the crown in parliament, ii. 96.
Influenza, ii. 359.
Inns and taverns, the ease enjoyed in good ones, ii. 394.
Inquisition, i. 365.
Intellectual pre-eminence, the highest superiority, ii. 103.
......... nature abhors a vacuum, ii. 118.

....... men do not, like others, become narrow in a narrow place, iii. 220.
Johnson, Michael, (Dr. Johnson's father,) i. 9, seq.

his death, i. 44.
Sarah, (Dr. Johnson's mother,) Johnson's letters to, i. 261, 262, 263.
her death, i. 264.
Nathanael, (Dr. Johnson's brother,) i. 9.
Richard, schoolmaster at Nottingham, i. 153, n.
Dr. Samuel, his birth, i. 9.
touched by queen Anne for the evil, i. 15.
goes to school at Lichfield, i. 17-at Stourbridge, i. 21.
enters at Pembroke college, Oxon, i. 30.—Leaves it, i. 44.

becomes usher of Market Bosworth school, i. 48. See iv. 374, n.
........ removes to Birmingham, i. 49.

marries Mrs. Porter, i. 59.
opens an academy at Edial, i. 60.

goes to London with Garrick, i. 64.
....... a writer in the Gentleman's Magazine, i. 74, 75, etc. See iv. 375.

endeavours to obtain the gree of A. M. to get a school, i, 88, 89.
his distressed circumstances, and filial piety, i. 116, 117; iv. 330, n.

loses his wife, i. 173.
VOL. IV.

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