Transactions of the New York State Medical Association for the Year ..., Band 1

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Seite 570 - ... minister to the sick with due impressions of the importance of their office; reflecting that the ease, the health, and the lives of those committed to their charge, depend on their skill, attention and fidelity. They should study, also, in their deportment, so to unite tenderness with firmness, and condescension with authority, as to inspire the minds of their patients with gratitude, respect, and confidence.
Seite 212 - And had suffered many things of many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was nothing bettered, but rather grew worse...
Seite 577 - ... no intelligent regular practitioner, who has a license to practice from some medical board of known and acknowledged respectability recognized by this association, and who is in good moral and professional standing in the place in which he resides, should be fastidiously excluded from fellowship, or his aid refused in consultation, when it is requested by the patient.
Seite 580 - A physician, in his intercourse with a patient under the care of another practitioner, should observe the strictest caution and reserve. No meddling inquiries should be made—no disingenuous hints given relative to the nature and treatment of his disorder ; nor any course of conduct pursued that may directly or indirectly tend to diminish the trust reposed in the physician employed.
Seite 573 - The obedience of a patient to the prescriptions of his physician should be prompt and implicit. He should never permit his own crude opinions as to their fitness to influence his attention to them.
Seite 575 - There is no profession, from the members of which greater purity of character, and a higher standard of moral excellence are required, than the medical ; and to attain such eminence is a duty every physician owes alike to his profession and to his patients. It is due to the latter, as without it he cannot command their respect and confidence, and to both, because no scientific attainments can compensate for the want of correct moral principles.
Seite 571 - The obligation of secrecy extends beyond the period of professional services; — none of the privacies of personal and domestic life, no infirmity of disposition or flaw of character observed during professional attendance should ever be divulged by the physician except when he is imperatively required to do so.
Seite 576 - All practitioners of medicine, their wives, and their children while under the paternal care, are entitled to the gratuitous services of any one or more of the faculty residing near them, whose assistance may be desired.
Seite 575 - Equally derogatory to professional character is it for a physician to hold a patent for any surgical instrument or medicine ; or to dispense a secret nostrum, whether it be the composition or exclusive property of himself or of others.
Seite 570 - Secrecy and delicacy, when required by peculiar circumstances, should be strictly observed; and the familiar and confidential intercourse to which physicians are admitted in their professional visits, should be used with discretion, and with the most scrupulous regard to fidelity and honor.

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