An Answer to the Remarks and Recommendations of Her Majesty's Commissioners for Inquiring Into the State, &c. of the University of Cambridge So Far as They Relate to King's College: Addressed to the Right Honourable Lord Viscount Palmerston

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Seite 13 - Socage, the changing of one kind of temporal! services into other temporall services altereth neither the name nor the effect of the tenure ; so the changing of spiritual services into other spiritual services altereth neither the name nor the effect of the tenure. . And albeit the tenure in frankalmoigne is now reduced to a certaintie contained in the book of Common Prayer, yet seeing the original tenure was in frankalmoigne, and the change is by general!
Seite 13 - Since Littleton wrote, the lyturgye or book of Common Praier of celebrating divine service is altered. This alteration notwithstanding, yet the tenure in frankalmoigne remaineth ; and such prayers and divine service shall be said and celebrated, as now is authorized : yea, though the tenure be in particular, as Littleton hereafter (§ 137) saith, viz.
Seite 19 - Universities are not indigent, it must not be thought, therefore, that the poor have been robbed of their birthright . Rather the Universities, among other agencies, have so raised the condition of society, and mental cultivation is now so differently regarded, that persons intended for the learned professions are at present found only among the comparatively wealthy. Such persons, if elected for their merit to Fellowships and Scholarships, would most faithfully fulfil the main objects of founders,...
Seite 19 - Doubtless, colleges were eleemosynary foundations ; but their sole object was not, like that of an almshouse, to relieve indigence. They were intended, no doubt, to maintain scholars who were poor ; and in an age when learning was regarded as ignoble by the great, and when nearly all but the great were poor, persons willing to enter the University as students could hardly be found, except among the poor. If, in modern days, those who impart or seek education in the universities are not indigent,...
Seite 13 - ... other temporal services altereth neither the name nor the effect of the tenure ; so the changing of spiritual services into other spiritual services Altereth neither the name nor the effect of the tenure. And albeit the tenure in frankalmoigne is now reduced to a certaintie contained in the book of Common Prayer, yet seeing the original tenure was in frankal197 FRANKINCENSE. 200 moigne, and the change is by general consent by authority of parliament, whercunto every man is party, the tenure remains...
Seite 8 - ... shall be thought to stand with equity and good conscience, according to the true intent and meaning of the donors and founders thereof...
Seite 19 - Foundations; but that sole object was not, like that of an Almshouse, to relieve indigence. They were intended, no doubt, to maintain Scholars, who were poor ; and in an age, when learning was regarded as ignoble by the great, and, when nearly all but the great were poor, persons willing to enter the University as Students, could hardly be found, except among the poor.
Seite 22 - Bench, b. 1713. In 1757 he was appointed attorney-general ; and in 1762 made chief justice of the common pleas. In 176~> he was created a peer, and the year following advanced to the dignity of lord chancellor.
Seite 13 - ... service is altered. This alteration notwithstanding, yet the tenure in frankalmoigne remaineth ; and such prayers and divine service shall be said and celebrated, as now is authorized : yea, though the tenure be in particular, as Littleton hereafter (§ 137) saith, viz. to sing a mass, &c., or to sing a placebo et dirige, yet if the tenant saith the prayers now authorized, it sufficcth.
Seite 15 - Downing, and afterwards to other relations in succession, and in failure thereof to build and found a College in this University, upon a plan to be approved by the two Archbishops and the Masters of St John's and Clare Hall. This direction was the reason for giving them the power which they possess in elections and other matters, by the charter and statutes. Sir George died in 1749, and Sir Jacob in...

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