The Science of English Verse

Cover
C. Scribner's Sons, 1922 - 295 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 299 - The splendor falls on castle walls And snowy summits old in story: The long light shakes across the lakes, And the wild cataract leaps in glory, Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying, Blow, bugle; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying.
Seite 102 - Break, break, break, On thy cold gray stones, O Sea! And I would that my tongue could utter The thoughts that arise in me. O well for the fisherman's boy, That he shouts with his sister at play! O well for the sailor lad, That he sings in his boat on the bay! And the stately ships go on To their haven under the hill; But O for the touch of a...
Seite 94 - He is dead and gone, lady, He is dead and gone, At his head a grass-green turf, At his heels a stone.
Seite 92 - ... same, And keep invention in a noted weed, That every word doth almost tell my name, Showing their birth and where they did proceed? O, know, sweet love, I always write of you, And you and love are still my argument; So all my best is dressing old words new, Spending again what is already spent; For as the sun is daily new and old, So is my love still telling what is told.
Seite 193 - Could great men thunder As Jove himself does, Jove would ne'er be quiet, For every pelting, petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder ; nothing but thunder. — Merciful Heaven ! Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt Splitt'st the unwedgeable and gnarled oak Than the soft myrtle...
Seite 199 - Know thus far forth. By accident most strange, bountiful fortune, Now my dear lady, hath mine enemies Brought to this shore : and by my prescience I find my zenith doth depend upon A most auspicious star ; whose influence If now I court not, but omit, my fortunes Will ever after droop.
Seite 242 - I am of them that furthest come behind. Yet may I by no means my wearied mind Draw from the deer ; but as she fleeth afore Fainting I follow ; I leave off therefore, Since in a net I seek to hold the wind. 'Who list her hunt, I put him out of doubt As well as I, may spend his time in vain ! And graven with diamonds, in letters plain, There is written her fair neck round about; ' Noli me tangere ; for Caesar's I am, And wild for to hold, though I seem tame.
Seite 243 - Love that doth reign and live within my thought, And built his seat within my captive breast, Clad in the arms wherein with me he fought Oft in my face he doth his banner rest.
Seite 293 - Now, of versifying there are two sorts, the one Auncient, the other Moderne : the Auncient marked the quantitie of each silable, and according to that, framed his verse : the Moderne, observing onely number, (with some regarde of the accent,) the chiefe life of it, standeth in that lyke sounding of the words, which we call Ryme.
Seite 93 - And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me— filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating, "* Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door, Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door: This it is and nothing more.

Bibliografische Informationen