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What proves

No. 2. Cold LOCHLIN's smooth ships thro' the stormy surge.

P. 375.

this poem to be of considerable antiquity, is, the Norwegian vessels Somadh-leng, smooth ships, in contradistinction to those of our ancestors, which were covered with skins with the hair on, and appear indeed to have been little more than currachs, or round vessels formed with osier twigs and covered with hides, which have been used to cross ferries in Argyleshire in the memory of many now living. Yet the period in which this poem was composed appears to have been long subsequent to the FINGALIAN times; for we hear of cills, or tombs, on the

; sea-side, and of one sovereign under whose sway all the chiefs seem united. In the age of Fingal the four grey stones seem to have been the only memorial of the warrior or the hunter.

NO. 3.

a

Said MORFOLT, let no warrior further comé.P.386.

MORFOLT appears to have been a Norwegian, thrown py a tempest in his youth upon the British coast, where receiving much kindness, and being captivated with the beauty of a maiden whom he calls Bosmina, smooth soft hand, he had been induced to reside in the land of her kindred; but now, in sorrow for her death, and remorse for fighting against his own countrymen, devotes himself to certain destruction. The fragment breaks off abruptly, and leaves the sequel of the story in obscurity,

.THE

AGED BARD'S WISH:

TRANSLATION OF A GAELIC POEM COMPOSED

IN THE ISLE OF SKY.

As when a minstrel, taught by Heav'n to sing, Awakes high raptures to the vocal string.

POPE'S ODYSSEY,

H

I.
Oh! lay me by yon peaceful stream

That glides away so softly slow,
Where boughs exclude the noon-day beain,
And early violets round me blow*,

II.
And thou, O sun! with friendly eye

Regard my languid limbs of age ; While on the new spring grass they lie, · Their warmth restore, their pains assuage.

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III.
Then on the pure stream's sloping side,

Wave soft thy wings thou western gale,
Clear stream, how gently dost thou glide,
To wake the flow'rets of the vale.

IV.
The primrose pale, of lovely dye,

Around my dewy bank be spread;
The daisy ope its modest eye,
And golden blooms bedeck

my

bed,

V.
From lofty banks that bound my glen,

Let blossom'd branches softly bend,
While sweetly from each rocky den,

The little birds their love-notes blend.

VI.

Where from yon crag, with age so grey,

, The fresh stream bursts with rushing sound, And echo bears the din

away,
While ocean's distant waves resound.

VII.
Each rock and hill returns the strain

Of nature's joy that wakes around,
While sportive kids in frolic vein,

And roes in sprightly gambol bound,

VIII.
The low of hcrds on yonder gale

Comes pleasing to my aged ear,
And sweetly rural from the dale
The bleating of their young I hear.

IX.
And near me let the hinds repose,

And dappled fauns, when tir'd of play, Beside

my

brook's green margin close, Or where the dashing fountains play.

X.
Oh! wake the chace where I

may

hear
The hunter rouse th' impatient hounds ;
Their voice is music to my ear,
My cheek glows youthful at the sound.

XI.
I feel youth's cheerful spirit rise,

To hear the bugle sound so shrill, While triumph bursts in joyful cries, Where sinks the dun deer on the hill,

XII.
Then quick I see the goats rebound,

That morn and eve my steps pursue ;
Yon mountain tops their cries resound,

Which I at hopeless distance view *.

* The verses after this correspond with those of the same number in the original.

XIV.
I see Benard * of lofty brow,

Amidst his green locks dream the roes, A thousand hills appear below,

And on his head the clouds repose.

XV.

Above my glen I see the grove

Where first is heard the cuckoo's song ;
Where deer in peaceful freedom rove,
And pines protect the harmless throng.

XVI.
I see the lake where wild ducks play,

And lead about their tender young,
With water-lilies border'd gay,
Its banks with evergreens o'erhung,

XVII.
The water-nymph, with bosom white t's

Swims graceful on the swelling wave;
Her infant train, with new delight,

Their downy breasts incessant lave :

And when she wings her lofty flight,

Afar amidst the clouds to rise,
And when she quits my aching sight,

Commixing with the northern skies :
* See note No. 2. # No. 3.

No. 4:

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