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No. 2.
I see Benard, of lofty brow.-P. 398.

The fourteenth verse has great force in the original.Literally it runs thus :

“ I see Benard, chieftain of a thousand mountains ;
“ Among his locks are the visions of the roes,-
« On his head is the sleep of the clouds."

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No. 3.
The water-nymph, with bosom white.-P. 392.

Here the imagery grows so bold, and the expressions so peculiar to the original language, that it becomes necessary to render the sense, rather than the literal meaning, which again dilates two verses into three. The epithet translated water nymph, is still bolder in the original; for there the swan is called

Lovely white bosom'd maid.

No. 4., at the bottom of p. 398, is inserted by mistake

No. 5. P. 399. For the reason above-mentioned, I have marked the eighteenth verse so as to answer the corresponding verse of the original.

I am thus attentive to minute particulars, because a faithful, though not constrained, or literal translation from nature's own genuine language, as it may justly be called, affords a double pleasure.—The imagination is amused,

and the heart affected, by the picturesque and pathetic powers of original poetry; and the understanding and judgment are exercised in tracing the operations of the untutored mind, and the powers of unassisted genius.

No. 6.
Tell from what distant land the wind.-P. 399.

As there is very little frost or snow in the islands, great numbers of swans come there from Norway in the beginning of winter : some stay to hatch, but they mostly go northward in summer. This furnishes the bard with the fine image, very strongly expressed in the original, of the north wind bearing towards him the moan of the departed; upon which he enquires of the swan from what cold country that well known voice came. This affords him a pretence for digressing.

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SONGS.

The Author wrote these Songs at the request of her Friend Mr GEORGE THOMSON, in whose valuable Collection the Airs will be found, joined to the Verses, along with the beautiful Accompaniments of Haydn.

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‘Oh where, tell me where, is your Highland Laddie gone ? "Oh where, tell me where, is your Highland Laddie gone?' “ He's gone with streaming banners, where noble deeds are

“ done, “ And my sad heart will tremble; till he come safely home.

6 He's gone with streaming banners, where noble deeds are

66 done,

“ 'And my sad heart will tremble, till he come safely home.',

O where, tell me where, did your Highland Laddie stay? “O where, tell me where, did your Highland Laddie stay?' “ He dwelt beneath the holly-trees, beside the rapid Spey, “And many a blessing follow'd him, the day he went

away. 56 He dwelt beneath the holly-trees, beside the rapid Spey, • And many a blessing follow'd him, the day he went

away."

O what, tell me what, does your Highland Laddie wear ? • what, tell me what, does your Highland Laddie wear?' 66 A bonnet with a lofty plume, the gallant badge of war, And a plaid across the manly breast, that yet shall wear

a star.

"A bonnet with a lofty plume, the gallant badge of war, “ And a plaid across the manly breast, that yet shall wear

66 a star.”

• Suppose, ah suppose that some cruel cruel wound Should pierce your Highland Laddie, and all your hopes

« confound!' " The pipe would play a cheering march, the banners round

66 him fly,

5* The spirit of a Highland chief would lighten in his eye!

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