An Historical and Descriptive Account of British America: Comprehending Canada, Upper and Lower, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, the Bermudas, and the Fur Countries ... as Also an Account of the Manners and Present State of the Aboriginal Tribes ...

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Oliver & Boyd, 1839
 

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Seite 212 - Glenelg, now the colonial secretary, drew up for their guidance a series of instructions, in which he considered the claim to the disposal of the entire revenue somewhat exorbitant, and not warranted by British example, yet was willing, for the sake of peace, to consent to it, on certain conditions. These were, an independent provision for the judges, and salaries for the civil officers, fixed for a certain number of years, ten being mentioned as particularly suitable. With regard to the uncleared...
Seite 64 - Father, I love your daughter, will you give her to me, that the small roots of her heart may entangle with mine, so that the strongest wind that blows shall never separate them.
Seite 137 - They had been regarded at first with extreme antipathy, being probably considered as enemies of their race, seeking to subvert the native deities and customs. In the course of the late inroads, however, a considerable number had been carried off, and after suffering protracted torture and partial mutilation, had been spared and adopted. Then their meek deportment, their solemn ceremonies, and the fervour with which " they raised to God hands without fingers," made a strong impression on the savage...
Seite 76 - In that brighter land the sun ever shines unclouded, the forests abound with deer, the lakes and rivers with fish ; benefits which are farther enhanced in their imagination by a faithful wife and dutiful children. They do not reach it, however, till after a journey of several months, and encountering various obstacles; a broad river, a chain of lofty mountains, and the attack of a furious dog. This favoured country lies far in the west, at the remotest boundary of the earth, which is supposed to...
Seite 35 - Even the loosest sand, when within high-water mark, acquires a comparatively firm and smooth surface. The ledge, too, over which the waters of the St. Lawrence rush, being beneath them, and not opposing any resistance to their course, is little liable to be disintegrated by their action. We are not aware of such an effect being produced on any other cataract, nor does Mr. Lyell refer to any, although several falls are known to have existed from the remotest antiquity. The statements made by the neighbouring...
Seite 45 - Blumenbach as forming a particular variety of the human species, differing, though not very widely, from the Mongolian. Believing, as we do, that the New World was peopled from the Old, and considering that the Mongol race was situated nearest to the point where Asia and America come almost into contact, we incline to ascribe these variations merely to a change of outward circumstances. The face is broad and flat, with high cheek-bones; more rounded and arched, however, than in the allied type, without...
Seite 76 - Nothing," she then asked what she would see ; and being informed that she would see the Maker of heaven and earth, she expressed herself much at a loss what she could have to say to him. Many not only rejected this destiny for themselves, but were indignant at the efforts made to decoy their children after death into...
Seite 75 - They had even formed a distinct idea of the region whither they hoped to be transported, and of the new and happier mode of existence, free from those wars, tortures, and cruelties which throw so dark a shade over their lot upon earth. Yet their conceptions on this subject were by no means either exalted or spiritualized. They expected simply a prolongation of their present life and enjoyments, under more favourable circumstances, and with the same objects furnished in greater choice and abundance.
Seite 113 - A Frenchman who had spent a winter among the northern savages, imposed upon the credulity of Champlain by reporting that the river of the Algonquins (the Ottawa) issued from a lake which was connected with the North Sea ; that he had visited its shores, had there seen the wreck of an English vessel, and that one of the crew was still living with the Indians.