The Story of the Rocks: Fourteen Weeks in Popular Geology

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Seite 120 - Year after year beheld the silent toil That spread his lustrous coil; Still, as the spiral grew, He left the past year's dwelling for the new, Stole with soft step its shining archway through, Built up its idle door, Stretched in his last-found home, and knew the old no more.
Seite 255 - We have but faith: we cannot know, For knowledge is of things we see; And yet we trust it comes from thee, A beam in darkness: let it grow.
Seite 7 - Thy verse hath power that brightly might diffuse A breath, a kindling, as of spring, around, From its own glow of hope and courage high, And steadfast faith's victorious constancy. .True bard and holy ! — thou art e'en as one Who, by some secret gift of soul or eye, In every spot beneath the smiling sun, • Sees where the springs of living waters lie...
Seite 37 - For a stone, when it is examined, will be found a mountain in miniature. The fineness of Nature's work is so great, that, into a single block, a foot or two in diameter, she can compress as many changes of form and structure, on a small scale, as she needs for her mountains on a large one ; and, taking moss for forests, and grains of crystal for crags, the surface of a stone, in by far the plurality of instances, is more interesting than the surface of an ordinary hill ; more fantastic in form, and...
Seite 120 - Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul, As the swift seasons roll! Leave thy low-vaulted past! Let each new temple, nobler than the last, Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast, Till thou at length art free, Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea!
Seite 37 - There are no natural objects out of which more can be thus learned than out of stones. They seem to have been created especially to reward a patient observer. Nearly all other objects in nature can be seen, to some extent, without patience, and are pleasant even in being half seen. Trees, clouds, and rivers are enjoyable even by the careless ; but the stone under his foot has for carelessness nothing in it but stumbling : no pleasure is languidly to be had out of it, nor food, nor good of any kind;...
Seite 156 - The roof is covered as with a canopy of gorgeous tapestry, encircled with festoons of most graceful foliage, flung in wild, irregular profusion over every portion of its surface. The effect is heightened by the contrast of the coalblack colour of these vegetables with the light groundwork of the rock to which they are attached.

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