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Hoping it was but an effect of humour;
Which sometime hath his hour with every man.
It will not let you eat, nor talk, nor sleep;
And could it work fo much upon your shape,
As it hath much prevailid on your condition,
I fhould not know you, Brutus. Dear my Lord,
Make me acquainted with your cause of grief.

Bru. I am not well in health, and that is all.

Por, Brutus is wife, and, were he not in health, He would embrace the means to come by it.

Bru. Why, so I do: good Porcia, go to bed.

Por. Is Brutus fick ? and is it physical
To walk unbraced, and fuck up the humours
Of the dank morning? what, is Brutus fick ?
And will he fteal out of his wholesome bed,
To dare the vile contagion of the night!
And tempt the rheumy and unpurged air,
To add unto his fickness ? no, my Brutus,
You have some sick offence within
Which, by the Right and Virtue of my place,
I ought to know of: and, upon my knees,
I charm you, by my once-commended beauty,
By all your vows of love, and that
Which did incorporate and make us one,
That you unfold to me, yourself, your half,
Why you are heavy: and what men to-night
Have had refort to you : for here have been
Some fix or seven, who did hide their faces
Even from darkness.

Bru. Kneel not, gentle Porcia.

Por. I should not need, if you were gentle Brutus.
Within the bond of marriage, tell me, Brutus,
Is it excepted, I should know no secrets
That appertain to you ? am I yourself,
But, as it were, in fort or limitation ?
To keep with you at meals, confort your bed, (8)

And

your mind,

great vow

comfort your Bed, And talk to you im -]

And talk to you sometimes ? dwell I but in the suburbs
Of your good pleasure? if it be no more,
Porcia is Brutus' harlot, not his wife.

Bru. You are my true and honourable wife ;
As dear to me, as are the ruddy drops
That visit my fad heart..

Por. If this were true, then should I know this secret. I grant,

I am a woman; but withal,
A woman that Lord Brutus took to wife :
I

grant, I am a woman; but withal,
A woman well reputed ; Cato's daughter.
Think you, I am no stronger than my fex,
Being so father'd, and fo husbanded
Tell me your counfels, I will not disclose them:
I have made strong proof of my constancy,
Giving myself a voluntary wound
Here, in the thigh : can I bear that with patience,
And not my husband's secrets ?
Bru. O ye

Gods !
Render me worthy of this noble wife.

[Knock.
Hark, hark, one knocks : Porcia, go in a while ;
And, by and by, thy bosom shall partake
The secrets of my

heart.
All my engagements I will construe to thee,
All the charactery of my fad brows.
Leave me with hafte.

[Exit Porcia.
Enter Lucius and Ligarius.
Lucius, who's there that knocks ?
Luc. Here is a fick man, that would speak with you.

Bru. Caius Ligarius, that Metellus spake of. Boy, stand afide. Caius Ligarius! how?

Cai. Vouchsafe good-morrow from a feeble tongue.

Bru. O, what a time have you chose out, brave Caius, To wear a kerchief? 'would, you were not sick!

This is but an odd Phrase, and gives as odd ån Idea. The Word, I have substituted, seems much more proper ; and is one of our Poet's own Usage upon the like Occafions; which makes me fufpect, he employ'd it here.

Cai.

B 4

Cai. I am not sick, if Brutus have in hand Any exploit worthy the name of honour.

Bru. Such an exploit have I in hand, Ligarius,
Had you an healthful ear to hear it.

Cai. By all the Gods the Romans bow before,
I here discard my fickness. Soul of Rome !
Brave son, deriv'd from honourable loins !
Thou, like an Exorcist, hast conjur'd up
My mortified spirit. Now bid me run,
And I will strive with things impossible ;
Vea, get the better of them. What's to do?

Bru. A piece of work, that will make fick men whole.
Cai. But are not some whole, that we must make sicks

Bru. That we must also. What it is, my Caius,
I shall unfold to thee, as we are going,
To whom it must be done.

Cai. Set on your foot,
And with a heart new-fir'd I follow you,
To do I know not what: but it sufficeth,
That Brutus leads me on.
Bru. Follow me then.

[Exeunt.

SCENE changes to Cæsar's Palace,

Cal.NO

peace to

Thunder and Lightning. Enter Julius Cæsar.
OR heav'n, nor earth, have been at

night;
Thrice hath Calphurnia in her sleep cry'd out,
Help, ho! they murder Cæfar." Who's within ?

Enter a Servant.
Serv. My Lord ?

Caf. Go bid the priests do present facrifice,
And bring me their opinions of success.
Serv. I will, my Lord.

[Exit. Enter Calphurnia. Cal. What mean you, Cæfar? think you to walk forth?

You

You shall not ftir out of your house to-day.

Cæs. Cæfar shall forth; the things, that threatned me, Ne'er lookt but on my back: when they shall see The face of Cæfar, they are vanished.

Cal. Cæfar, I never stood on ceremonies,
Yet now they fright me : there is one within,
(Besides the things that we have heard and seen)
Recounts most horrid fights feen by the Watch.
A lioness hath whelped in the streets,
And Graves have yawn'd, and yielded up their dead;
Fierce fiery warriors fight upon the clouds,
In ranks and squadrons and right form of war,
Which drizzled blood upon the Capitol :
The noise of battle hurtled in the air;
Horses did neigh, and dying men did groan;
And Ghosts did shriek, and squeal about the streets.
O Cæsar! these things are beyond all use,
And I do fear them.

Cæs. What can be avoided,
Whose end is purpos’d by the mighty Gods?
Yet Cæfar fhall go forth : for these predictions
Are to the world in general, as to Cæfar.

Cal. When Beggars die, there are no comets seen; The heav'ns themselves blaze forth the death of Princes,

Cæf. Cowards die many times before their deaths,
The valiant never taste of death but once :
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange, that men should fear:
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come, when it will come.

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Enter á Servant,

What say the Augurs?

Serv. They would not have you to stir forth to-day. Plucking the entrails of an Offering forth, They could not find a heart within the beast.

[Exit Servant. Cæs. The Gods do this in shame of cowardise ; Cafar should be a beast without a heart,

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If he should stay at home to-day for fear.
No, Cæfar shall not; Danger knows full well,
That Cafar is more dangerous than he.
(9) We were two lions litter'd in one day,
And I the elder and more terrible ;
And Cafar shall go forth.

Cal. Alas, my Lord,
Your wisdom is consum'd in confidence :
Do not go

forth to-day; call it my fear,
That keeps you in the house, and not your own,
We'll send Mark Antony to the Senate-house,
And he will say, you are not well to-day :
Let me, upon my knee, prevail in this.

Cæf. Mark Antony shall say, I am not well;
And, for thy humour, I will stay at home.

Enter Decius.
Here's Decius Brutus, he shall tell them fo.

Dec. Cæfar, all hail ! good morrow, worthy Cæfar ; I come to fetch you to the Senate-house.

Cæs. And you are come in very happy time,
To bear my Greeting to the Senators,
And tell them that I will not come to-day :
Cannot, is false; and that I dare not, faller ;
I will not come to-day; tell them so, Decius.

Cul. Say, he is fick.

Caf. Shall Cæfar send a lye?'
Have I in conqueft ftretcht mine arm so far,
'To be afraid to tell Grey-beards the truth?
Decius, go tell them, Cæfar will not come.

Dec. Moft mighty Cafar, let me know some cause, Left I be laugh'd at, when I tell them fo.

Gal. The cause is in my will, I will not come ;

(9) We heard two Lions The firft Folio We beareThe Copies have been all corrupt, and the Paffage, of course, unintelligible. But the Night Alteration, I have made, restores Sense to the whole; and the Sentiment will neither be unworthy of ShakeSpeare, nor the boast too extravagant for Cæfar in a Vein of Vanity to utter: that he and Danger were two Twin-whelps of a Lion, and de the Elder, and more terrible of the Two

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