The Worthies of Cumberland, Band 5

Cover
George Routledge & sons, 1874
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 265 - The which observed, a man may prophesy, With a near aim, of the main chance of things As yet not come to life, which in their seeds And weak beginnings lie intreasured. Such things become the hatch and brood of time...
Seite 38 - Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade, Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap, Each in his narrow cell forever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Seite 44 - For nature crescent does not grow alone In thews and bulk, but, as this temple waxes, The inward service of the mind and soul Grows wide withal.
Seite 210 - In all chemical investigations it has justly been considered an important object to ascertain the relative weights of the simples which constitute a compound. But unfortunately the inquiry has terminated here ; whereas from the relative weights in the mass, the relative weights of the ultimate particles or atoms of the bodies might have been inferred, from which their number and weight in various other compounds would appear, in order to assist and to guide future investigations, and to correct their...
Seite 245 - The character of the true philosopher is to hope all things not impossible, and to believe all things not unreasonable.
Seite 211 - Now it is one great object of this work, to show the importance and advantage of ascertaining the relative weights of the ultimate particles both of simple and compound bodies, the number of simple elementary particles which constitute one compound particle, and the number of less compound particles which enter into the formation of one more compound particle.
Seite 180 - All these things being considered, it seems probable to me that God in the beginning formed matter in solid, massy, hard, impenetrable, movable particles, of such sizes and figures, and with such other properties and in such proportion to space as most conduced to the end for which he formed them...
Seite 158 - I am nearly persuaded that the circumstance depends upon the weight and number of the ultimate particles of the several gases : Those whose particles are lightest and single being least absorbable and the others more according as they increase in weight and complexity.
Seite xi - BROWN. 2 vols., crown 8vo, cloth, 15s. The Biography of Samson Illustrated and Applied. By the REV. JOHN BRUCE, DD, Minister of Free St. Andrew's Church, Edinburgh. Second Edition.
Seite 264 - Mr. Dalton's permanent reputation will rest upon his having discovered a simple principle, universally applicable to the facts of chemistry — in fixing the proportions in which bodies combine, and thus laying the foundation for future labours, respecting the sublime and transcendental parts of the science of corpuscular motion. His merits, in this respect, resemble those of Kepler in astronomy.

Bibliografische Informationen