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ADVERTISEMENT.

The Publisher begs leave to acquaint his Subscribers,

that the future Numbers of this Edition will be enriched

with some hitherto unpublished Sermons of Dr. Barrow.

June 1st was published, No. I. price 78. 6d. of

A SERIES OF THE MOST ESTÈEMED

DIVINES

OF THE

CHURCH OF ENGLAND.

WITH

A LIFE OF EACH AUTHOR,

A SUMMARY OF EACH SERMON OR DISCOURSE, NOTES, &c.

BY THE Rev. T. S. HUGHES, B.D.

OF EMMANUEL COLLEGE ; EXAMINING CHAPLAIN TO THE BISHOP OF

PETERBOROUGH, AND LATE CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE IN THE

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE.

To be continued in Monthly Volumes, in a cheap, uniform, and commodious

size, and printed by A. J. Valpy, M.A. Red Lion Court, Fleet Street; where Subscribers' names for a part or the whole of the Series are received, as well as by all Booksellers in Town and Country.

It has frequently been a subject of complaint, that a Collection of the best English Divines, from the scarcity of good editions, and the expense of procuring them, is rarely met with in the Libraries even of our Clergy, although the

the sources to which, after the Holy Scriptures, they must apply for instruction and edification. A few select volumes of some favorite Authors are perhaps found on their shelves; but a regular Series, exhibiting the profound researches, the luminous expositions, the interesting criticisms, and the noble eloquence of British Theologians, falls to the lot of few : indeed our great public repositories themselves are not unfrequently deficient in this important branch of literature. To remedy these defects, and to enable the Clergy and Laymen to possess a treasure of such real excellence, at a time too when the Church of England requires the best exertions of her sons, is the object of the present undertaking.

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It would indeed be discreditable to an age, in which the works of so many Authors have been reprinted in a form combining both economy and convenience, if those of the great ornaments of our Church should be withheld from an extended circulation. It is proposed therefore to publish a Series on the following plan :

Each work will be preceded by a Biographical Memoir of its Author, comprising a general account of the times in which he lived, with a particular reference to the state of religious opinions.

An Argument or concise Summary of Contents will be prefixed to every Sermon, Tract, or Disquisition, contained in each Volume; so that not only direct access may be had to any portion required for perusal or consultation, but the Summary of each Sermon may be considered as a Skeleton well calculated to assist the young Divine in Composition.

Notes and observations will be added wherever they may appear necessary or useful; and at the end of each Author will be given an Index of those Scriptural passages which have been commented on in such Author.

Strict chronological order will not be observed in the Series; but those Authors will be first published, which may be considered as more immediately required.

The works of Bishop Sherlock, the only uniform edition hitherto published, are now completed in five volumes: after Dr. Barrow will follow the most popular works of Hall, Atterbury, Jewell, Seed, Jortin, South, Hurd, Bull, Beveridge, Balguy, S. Clarke, Ogden, Paley, IVaterland, Jer. Taylor, &c.

A Volume will appear on the first of every month, in small 8vo., containing on an average 500 pages neatly printed, price 78. 6d. and may be bad of all Booksellers in Town and Country, with the Magazines and Reviews.

It is expected that the whole Scries will not exceed FIFTY VOLUMES; but any Author may be had separately.

OPINIONS

ON

• THE DIVINES OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND.'

• An excellent work. The Life of Bishop Sherlock is written in a liberal and manly spirit, which does credit to the writer, and to the Prelate to whom it is dedicated.'-- Times, June 8.

• It is an extraordinary fact, but not more extraordinary than true, that there is actually no collection of the works of our most celebrated Divines in existence; and that greatly as many of them adorned their profession by solid learning and sound piety, it is really a matter of difficulty to procure a complete edition of any of their works. A stronger fact than this could not well be adduced to prove the necessity and utility of such a publication as the present. The editorial department has been intrusted to the Rev. T. S. Hughes, of Emmanuel College ; and from the specimen which he has given us in the present volume, of his qualifications for the task, we have no doubt that he will discharge it with credit. The work is one which ought not only to find its way into the library of every Clergyman, but of every private family; and, indeed, when we consider the nature of it, we are only astonished that it should not long ago bave found its way into both, from the shops of some of our most enterprising bibliopolists. No works are more esteemed or more consulted by theological students and readers than those proposed to be included in this collection, and none assuredly deserve more to be so used.'- Morning Adderliser, June 4.

• This is the first volume of a series intended to supply an important desideratum in the libraries of Churchmen, by whom a collection of the best English Divines las long been wanting.'-Courier, June 10.

• This work bids fair to become one of the most popular, as it is decidedly one of the most valuable productions of the present day. It commences with the Discourses of Bishop Sherlock, one of the most eminent and enlightened writers that ever lent dignity to the episcopal mitre. No Divine, no Student, nay, no Gentleman, should be without it. No work is at present more needed, or more likely to secure at once the extensive circulation that it deserves.'Sun, June 10.

* This monthly series will no doubt realise the intentions of its highly-talented Editor. The work must be generally interesting to all who in any way connect their pursuits with theological learning, but more particularly to the Clergy. We are glad that Mr. Hughes has given so much original matter in bis work, and we shall be much mistaken if the Summaries themselves do not

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