The Mirror of History, Or, Lives of the Men of Great Eras, from Julius Caesar to William the Conqueror

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R. Baldwin, 1851 - 303 Seiten

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Seite 23 - If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle. I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on ; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent ; That day he overcame the Nervii. — Look ! in this place, ran Cassius...
Seite 130 - Tis mightiest in the mightiest ; It becomes The throned monarch better than his crown : His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings ; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice.
Seite 130 - The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath : it is twice blest; It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes: 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown...
Seite 23 - This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him. Then burst his mighty heart, And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's statue, Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
Seite 34 - But he her fears to cease, Sent down the meek-eyed Peace ; She, crowned with olive green, came softly sliding Down through the turning sphere, His ready harbinger, With turtle wing the amorous clouds dividing : And, waving wide her myrtle wand, ' She strikes a universal peace through sea and land.
Seite 23 - Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all, For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors
Seite 176 - is the key of heaven and of hell; a drop of blood shed in the cause of God, a night spent in arms, is of more avail than two months of fasting and prayer; whosoever falls in battle, his sins are forgiven; at the day of judgment his wounds shall be resplendent as vermilion, and odoriferous as musk; and the loss of his limbs shall be supplied by the wings of angels and cherubim.
Seite 67 - ... dogs; others again, smeared over with combustible materials, were used as torches to illuminate the darkness of the night.
Seite 139 - The emperor (says he) wears on his head either a diadem, or a crown of gold, decorated with precious stones of inestimable value. These ornaments, and his purple garments, are reserved for his sacred person alone ; and his robes of silk are embroidered with the figures of golden dragons. His throne is of massy gold. Whenever he appears in public, he is surrounded by his courtiers, his guards, and his attendants.
Seite 173 - O prophet, I am the man : whosoever rises against thee, I will dash out his teeth, tear out his eyes, break his legs, rip up his belly. O prophet, I will be thy vizir over them.

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