The Aesculapian Register: 1824. [Vol. 1, Nos. 1-26, June 17-Dec. 9, 1824].

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Robert Desilver, 1824 - 208 Seiten
 

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Seite 38 - A physician, in his intercourse with a patient under the care of another practitioner, should observe the strictest caution and reserve. No meddling inquiries should be made ; no disingenuous hints given relative to the nature and treatment of his disorder ; nor any course of conduct pursued that may directly or indirectly tend to diminish the trust reposed in the physician employed.
Seite 15 - A physician should not be forward to make gloomy prognostications, because they savor of empiricism, by magnifying the importance of his services in the treatment or cure of the disease. But he should not fail, on proper occasions, to give to the friends of the patient timely notice of danger when it really occurs ; and even to the patient himself, if absolutely necessary.
Seite 178 - A physician afflicted with disease is usually an incompetent judge of his own case; and the natural anxiety and solicitude which he experiences at the sickness of a wife, a child, or any one who by the ties of consanguinity is rendered peculiarly dear to him, tend to obscure his judgment...
Seite 195 - ... 8. A physician, when visiting a sick person in the country, may be desired to see a neighboring patient who is under the regular direction of another physician, in consequence of some sudden change or aggravation of symptoms. The conduct to be pursued on such an occasion is to give advice adapted to present circumstances ; to interfere no...
Seite 15 - Physicians should, therefore, minister to the sick with due impressions of the importance of their office ; reflecting that the ease, the health, and the lives of those committed to their charge, depend on their skill, attention and fidelity. They should study, also, in their deportment, so to unite tenderness with firmness, and condescension with authority, as to inspire the minds of their patients with gratitude, respect and confidence.
Seite 166 - A physician ought not to abandon a patient because the case is deemed incurable; for his attendance may continue to be highly useful to the patient, and comforting to the relatives around him, even in the last period of a fatal malady, by alleviating pain and other symptoms, and by soothing mental anguish. To decline attendance, under such* circumstances, would be sacrificing to fanciful delicacy and mistaken liberality, that moral duty, which is independent of and far superior to all pecuniary consideration.
Seite 188 - SECTION 1. Diversity of opinion and opposition of interest, may, in the medical as in other professions, sometimes occasion controversy and even contention.
Seite 171 - ... in the groin, or under the arm-pits, some as big as a small apple, others as an egg ; and afterwards purple spots in most parts of the body : in some cases large and but few in number, in others less and more numerous, both sorts the usual messengers of death.
Seite 43 - ... to ascertain the fact. He first put his own hand into warm water to make it as sensible as possible, and then felt under the arm, and at the heart, and affirmed that he felt an unusual warmth, though no one else could. He had the body restored to a warm bed, and insisted that the people who had been invited to the funeral, should be requested not to attend. To this the brother objected as absurd, the eyes being sunk, the lips discolored, and the whole body cold and stiff.
Seite 43 - In the evening, his physician and friend returned from a ride into the country, and was afflicted beyond measure at the news of his death. He could not be persuaded that it was certain; and on being told that one of the persons who had assisted in laying out the body thought he had observed a little tremor of the flesh under the arm, although the body was cold and stiff", he endeavored to ascertain the fact.

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