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OLD CHRISTMAS.

205

And all the workhouse children

He sets them down in a row,
And giveth them rare plum-pudding,

And two-pence a-piece also.

Oh, could you have seen those paupers,

Have heard those children young,
You would wish with them that Christmas

Came often and tarried long !

He must be a rich old fellow,

What money he gives away! There is not a lord in England

Could equal him any day!

Good luck unto old Christmas,

And long life, let us sing,
For he doth more good unto the poor
Than many a crowned king !

Mary Howitz.

191. CHRISTMAS IN THE OLDEN TIME.

FROM AN OLD Song.
A MAN might then behold

At Christmas, in each hail,
Good fires to curb the cold,

And meat for great and small.
The neighbours were friendly bidden,

And all had welcome true,
The poor from the gates were not chidden
When this old cap was new.

ANON.

206

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.

192. HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Home for the Holidays, here we go ; Bless me! the train is exceedingly slow! Pray, Mr. Engineer, get up your steam, And let us be off, with a puff and a scream ! We have two long hours to travel, you say ; Come, Mr. Engineer, gallop away! : Two hours more! why the sun will be down Before we reach dear old London town! And then what a number of fathers, and mothers, And uncles, and aunts, and sisters, and brothers, Will be there to meet us-oh! do make haste, For I'm sure, Mr. Guard, we have no time to waste! Thank goodness, we shan't have to study and stammer Over Latin, and sums, and that nasty French Grammar; Lectures, and classes, and lessons are done, And now we'll have nothing but frolic and fun. Home for the holidays, here we go! But this Fast Train is really exceedingly slow. We shall have sport when Christmas comes, When “snap-dragon” burns our fingers and thumbs : We'll hang mistletoe over our dear little cousins, And pull them beneath it and kiss them by dozens : We shall have games at “ blind-man's-buff," And noise and laughter, and romping enough : We'll crown the plum-pudding with bunches of bay, And roast all the chestnuts that come in our way; And when Twelfth Night falls, we'll have such a cake, That as we stand round it the table shall quake. We'll draw “King and Queen,” and be happy together, And dance old“Sir Roger" with hearts like a feather. . Home for the holidays, here we go! But this Fast Train is really exceedingly slow! And we'll go and see Harlequin's wonderful feats, Changing by magic whatever he meets; And Columbine, too, with her beautiful tripping, And clown, with his tumbling, and jumping, and slipping, Cramming all things in his pocket so big, And letting off crackers in Pantaloon's wig. The horses that danced too, last year in the ring, We remember the tune, it was sweet “ Tink-a-Ting;"

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.

207

And their tails, and their manes, and their sleek coats so

bright; Some cream and some piebald, some black and some white; And how Mr. Merryman made us all shout, When he fell from the horse, and went rolling about; We'll be sure to go there-'tis such capital fun, And we won't stir an inch till it's every bit done! Mr. Punch, we'll have him too, our famous old friend; One might see him for ever and laugh to the end : With his little dog Toby, so clever and wise, And poor Mrs. Judy, with tears in her eyes ; With the constable taking him off to the bar, And the gentleman talking his “Shalla-balla;" With the flourishing stick that knocks all of them down, For Punch’s delight is in breaking a crown. Home for the Holidays, here we go! But really this train is exceedingly slow; Yet, stay! I declare here is London at last; The Park is right over the tunnel just pass'd. Huzza! huzza ! I can see my papa! I can see George's uncle, and Edward's mamma! And Fred, there's your brother! look ! look ! there he stands ; They see us ! they see us ! they’re waving their hands ! Why don't the train stop ? what are they about ? Now, now it is steady-oh ! pray let us out! A cheer for old London, a kiss for mamma, We're home for the holidays. Now, huzza !

ELIZA Cook.

193. A FAREWELL.
My fairest child, I have no song to give you ;

No lark could pipe to skies so dull and grey :
Yet ere we part, one lesson I can leave you

For every day.
Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever;

Do noble things, not dream them, all day long,
And so make life, death, and that vast for ever,
One grand, sweet song.

KINGSLEY.

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BILLING, PRINTER AND STEREOTYPER, GUILDFORD, SURREY.

INDEX.

167. Boyhood

IIlllll

205

BEAUMONT &

98. Spring

::::

US

PAGE
ALLSTON.

... 183
ANON.
8. Every Little lielps

... 11
9. The Dying Boy ...
103. St. Anthony's Sermon to the Fishes (Translated
from Ulrich Megerle)

119
125. Count Eberhard (Ti anslated from Zimmerman) ... 142
140. Music and Devotion

160
144. Childhood's Hallowed Prayer (Trans. V. Hugo)... 162
164. The Little Brown Man (Trans. Beranger) ...
176. The Fatherless

190
178. Written on the Loss of a Favourite Child

191
181. Is it wrong to wish to see Them?

194
190. Christmas in the Olden Time

194. Now pray we for our Country
BARBAULD, MRS. 183*. Mercy ...
BATES,
52. Speak Gently ... ...

60

113
FLETCHER.
BENNETT. 12. A Village Tale

22. Baby May
31. Cry of the Spring Flower Seller
41. A Summer Invocation
62. Baby's Shoes
81. From India

96
92. A Sketch from a Painter's Studio

107
BETHUNE,DR. 169. The Angel Strife ...
BLAKE.

1. Introduction to Songs of Innocence
2. The Lamb ... ...
21. The Divine Image ...
122. The Echoing Green ..
152. On Another's Sorrow

170
BOWLES. 25. Bird in a Cage

29
BOWRING.
183**. Mercy .

196
BROOKS, 108. Night Song (Translated from Claudius) ... 124
BROOME. 132. Evening
BROWNING. 127, The Pied Piper of Hamelin

144
BRYDGES. 156. Couplets
BURROWS,MARY. 87. Love and Friendship the Sunshine of the
155. A Simile

178
172. The Village Church
BURNS.
32. The Seat of Happiness

37
182**. Charity ... ...
BYRON,

15. Pleasant Things
54. The Destruction of Sennacherib
106. A Sleeping Child

133. Loch-na Garr
CAMPBELL,

16. Hohenlinden
88. The Soldier's Dream
137. Autumn Flowers

131

156

174

Heart

187

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157

20
103
158

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