The Official Report of the Recent Arctic Expedition, Band 2

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J. Murray, 1876 - 96 Seiten
 

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Seite 34 - ... days we experienced light westerly winds, with the temperature ranging between 18° and 8°. The pack remained always close against the coast, moving along the land with the tides, but drifting on the whole towards the south-east. Pools of water half a mile long by a quarter broad formed on the south-east side of the larger floes, but they were always completely isolated from each other by several miles of heavy ice. Although a few large floes could be distinguished in the offing, the pack within...
Seite 62 - ... instead of rendering the road smoother, as they frequently do in travelling along a coast line, when advantage can be taken of their long smooth tops, had to be encoiintered nearly at right angles. The whole formed the roughest line of way imaginable without the slightest prospect of ever improving. The journey was consequently an incessant battle to overcome ever recurring obstacles; each hard-won success stimulating them for the next struggle. A passage-way had always to be cut through the...
Seite 54 - Both men and officers were unanimous in favour of the change and willingly put up with the misery of standing still in the cold with cold feet during the long halt needed for the purpose of boiling the water ; and all agreed that they worked better after the tea lunch than during the forenoon.
Seite 3 - Accordingly both ships proceeded at full speed to the westward, racing in company for Cape York, with only about a dozen icebergs in sight ahead, floating quietly on a calmly mirrored sea, to dispute our passage.
Seite 72 - On considering the result of the spring sledging operations, I concluded that, owing to the absence of land trending to the northward and the Polar pack not being navigable, no ship could be carried north on either side of Smith's Sound beyond the position we had already attained ; and also that from any attainable position in Smith's Sound it was impossible to advance nearer the pole by sledges.
Seite 47 - Naturalist to the Expedition ; preferring that the report on the numerous scientific subjects to which he has directed his attention should emanate from himself: I will merely state here that no one moment has been lost by this indefatigable collector and observer. He has, moreover, by his genial disposition and ready help on all occasions, won the friendship of all, and I feel confident that their Lordships will highly appreciate his valuable services. I am only doing him justice when I state that...
Seite 35 - September to look at a bay seen from our hill station about eight miles distant from us to the westward. They reported that it was a well-sheltered harbour, thickly coated with this season's ice, but that the continuous wall formed by the grounded floe-bergs across the entrance to it would effectually prevent our entering. After this report, with the temperature remaining steady between...
Seite 62 - Separating these floes, as it were, by a broadened out-hedge, lay a vast collection of de'bris of the previous summer's broken-up pack ice, which had been re-frozen during the winter into one chaotic rugged mass of angular blocks of various heights up to 40 and 50 feet, and every possible shape, leaving little, if any, choice of road over, through, or round about them.
Seite 30 - ... broken-up pack which the old voyagers, with their sailing vessels, necessarily deemed impassable. At the same time there is a limit to the risks which are advisable to be run ; no ship has been built which could withstand a real nip between two pieces of heavy ice. Shortly after the ship was secured in her former position to the firm ice in Lincoln Bay, the wind gradually freshened from the SW, blowing slightly off the land; accompanied with a snowstorm and a threatening appearance of the weather....
Seite 6 - Markham and myself proceeded in a boat to Littleton Island and Lifeboat Cove, the scene of the wreck of the " Polaris." The cache mentioned by Dr. Emil Bessels and Mr. Bryant of the " United States North Pole Expedition " as the depository of certain instruments and boxes of books, was very readily discovered, but contained nothing. Articles of clothing and numerous small caches containing seal and walrus meat were scattered about the small peninsula in the neighbourhood of the late winter quarters...

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