The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Band 30,Seite 1

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Seite 278 - Nor good, nor bad, nor fools, nor wise ; They would not learn, nor could advise : Without love, hatred, joy, or fear, They led — a kind of — as it were : Nor wish'd, nor car'd, nor laugh'd, nor cried- : And so they liv'd, and so they died.
Seite 213 - With which in hele I shall ryght wele Endure, as ye shall see ; And, or we go, a bedde or two I can provyde anone ; For, in my mynde, of all mankynde I love but you alone.
Seite 220 - He made his wish with his estate comply, Joyful to live, yet not afraid to die. One child he had, a daughter chaste and fair, His age's comfort, and his fortune's heir. They call'd her Emma ; for the beauteous dame, Who gave the virgin birth, had borne the name ; The name th' indulgent father doubly lov'd ; For in the child the mother's charms improv'd.
Seite 75 - I'd go to school six hours on Christmas-day, Or construe Persius while my comrades play. Such work by hireling actors should be done, Who tremble when they see a critic frown: Poor rogues, that smart like fencers for their bread. And, if they are not wounded, are not fed. But, sirs, our labour has more noble ends, We act our tragedy to see our friends: Our generous scenes are for pure love repeated, And if you are not pleas'd, at least you're treated.
Seite 129 - Chloe, and what I write, shows The difference there is betwixt nature and art: I court others in verse; but I love thee in prose: And they have my whimsies; but thou hast my heart.
Seite 44 - IN vain you tell your parting lover You wish fair winds may waft him over. Alas ! what winds can happy prove, That bear me far from what I love ? Alas ! what dangers on the main Can equal those that I sustain, From slighted vows, and cold disdain?
Seite 106 - Pris'ner free, Who ne'er intended Harm to Thee. To Me pertains not, She replies, To know or care where CUPID flies ; What are his Haunts, or which his Way ; Where He would dwell, or whither stray : Yet will I never set Thee free : For Harm was meant, and Harm to Me.
Seite 209 - Your wanton wyll for to fulfill, In grene wode you to play ; And that ye myght from your delyght No lenger make delay. Rather than ye sholde thus for me Be called an yll woman, Yet wolde I to the grene wode go, Alone, a banyshed man.
Seite 4 - Nor was this nicety of his judgment confined only to books and literature, but was the same in statuary, painting, and all other parts of art. Bernini would have taken his opinion upon the beauty and attitude of a figure ; and King Charles did not agree with Lely, that my Lady Cleveland's picture was finished, till it had the approbation of my Lord Buckhurst.
Seite 136 - Be to her virtues very kind ; Be to her faults a little blind ; Let all her ways be unconfin'd ; And clap your padlock — on her mind.

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