Remarks on Secular & Domestic Architecture, Present & Future

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J. Murray, 1857 - 285 Seiten

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Seite 117 - ... whenever it finds occasion for change in its form or purpose, it submits to it without the slightest sense of loss either to its unity or majesty, — subtle and flexible like a fiery serpent, but ever attentive to the voice of the charmer.
Seite 141 - Unto the upright there ariseth light in the darkness : he is gracious, and full of compassion, and righteous.
Seite 287 - Handbook of Architecture. Being a Concise and Popular Account of the Different Styles prevailing in all Ages and Countries in the World. With a Description of the most remarkable Buildings.
Seite 119 - I am quite assured that all the irregularities that are so beautiful in ancient architecture are the result of certain necessary difficulties, and were never purposely designed ; for to make a building inconvenient for the sake of obtaining irregularity would be scarcely less ridiculous than preparing working drawings for a new ruin. But all these inconsistencies have arisen from this great error, — the plans of buildings are designed to suit the elevation, instead of the elevation being made subservient...
Seite 293 - The perfect composition, the nervous language, the well-turned periods of Dr. Robertson, inflamed me to the ambitious hope that I might one day tread in his footsteps: the calm philosophy, the careless inimitable beauties of his friend and rival, often forced me to close the volume with a mixed sensation of delight and despair.
Seite 297 - Thomas's Hospital. The object of this "Work is to afford some useful hints as to the means which people have in their own power to employ when accidents happen which require immediate attention and no medical man is at hand, and often cannot be obtained for hours. Such cases are neither few nor unimportant, and many serious consequences — nay, even death — may be prevented if a judicious person, having been put on the track, make use of the simple remedies almost every house affords. " "We have...
Seite 118 - ... not masked or concealed under one monotonous front, but by their variety in form and outline increasing the effect of the building.
Seite 118 - An architect should exhibit his skill by turning the difficulties which occur in raising an elevation from a convenient plan into so many picturesque beauties; and this constitutes the great difference between the principles of classic and pointed domestic architecture. In the former he would be compelled to devise expedients to conceal these irregularities; in the latter he has only to beautify them.
Seite 4 - It is not too much to say that the ruling theology of the Church of England in the latter half of the sixteenth and the beginning of the seventeenth century was...
Seite 117 - Undefined in its slope of roof, height of shaft, breadth of arch, or disposition of ground plan, it can shrink into a turret, expand into a hall, coil into a staircase, or spring into a spire, with undegraded grace and unexhausted energy...

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