Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, Band 3

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Vols. for 1938-61 include as pt. 2 of the December issue the Society's Abstracts, later published separately.
 

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Seite 158 - In the manufacture of glass, of which there is an immense quantity made- in Pittsburg, I am informed that gas is worth much more than the cost of coal and its handling, because it improves the quality of the product. One firm in Pittsburg is already making plate glass of the largest size, equal to the best imported French glass, and is enabled to do so by this fuel.
Seite 159 - Further observation showed that the gas wells were confined to a narrow belt, only one-fourth to one mile wide, along the crests of the anticlinal folds. These facts seemed to connect gas territory unmistakably with the disturbance in the rocks caused by their upheaval into arches, but the crucial test was yet to be made in the actual location of good gas territory on this theory. During the last two years I have submitted it to all manner of tests, both in locating and condemning gas territory,...
Seite 159 - The writer's study of this subject began in June, 1883, when he was employed by Pittsburg parties to make a general investigation of the natural gas question with the special object of determining whether or not it was possible to predict the presence or absence of gas from geological structure. In the prosecution of this work I was aided by a suggestion from Mr. William A. Karseman, of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, an oil operator of many years...
Seite 159 - After visiting all the great gas wells that had been struck in western Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and carefully examining the geological surroundings of each, I found that every one of them was situated either directly on or near the crown of an anticlinal axis, while wells that had been bored in the synclines on either side furnished little or no gas, but in many cases large quantities of salt water. Further observation showed that the gas wells were confined to a narrow belt, only one.fourth...
Seite 160 - Probably very few or none of the grand arches along the mountain ranges will be found holding gas in large quantity, since in such cases the disturbance of the stratification has been so profound that all the natural gas generated in the past would long ago have escaped into the air through fissures that traverse all the beds. (d) Another limitation might possibly be added, which would confine the areas where great gas flows may be obtained to those underlain by a considerable thickness of bituminous...
Seite 160 - In reply to Mr. Ashburner's criticism of the views advanced in my article on natural gas, I would say that the necessary brevity of the paper in question prevented the mention of many facts that might have rendered the conclusions clearer and less open to challenge. One of these is that my communication had especial reference to the natural gas regions proper, ie, where the gas is unconnected with the oil fields.
Seite 160 - Very fair gas wells may also be obtained for a considerable distance down the slopes from the crests of the anticlinals, provided the dip be sufficiently rapid, and especially if it be irregular or interrupted with slight crumples. And even in regions where there are no well marked anticlinals if the dip be somewhat rapid and irregular, rather large gas wells may occasionally be found, if all other conditions are favorable.
Seite 161 - ... mountains, from the Kanawha river to the Big Sandy, where, on its crest, near Warfield, two of the largest gas wells ever known have recently been struck. At Burning springs, on the Little Kanawha, the only large- gas wells were found on the very crest of the great uplift in that region. The gas belt of western Ohio, through Findlay and other towns, follows closely the line of the Cincinnati arch, and the same story is repeated in other localities too numerous to mention. "Mr. Ashburner can,...
Seite 153 - My working hypothesis was that since the gas pressure is due to a column of water, and since this must be practically the same for any limited area where the rock lies at the same depth below sea level, the oil deposit in this particular rock must extend across the country along the strike of the beds, in a pool comparable to the surface of a lake or a chain of small lakes, if the rock reservoir should not be equally porous everywhere along the strike. Hence, if my theory is true, it would only be...

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