A Conflict of Visions: Ideological Origins of Political Struggles

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Basic Books, 05.06.2007 - 352 Seiten
Controversies in politics arise from many sources, but the conflicts that endure for generations or centuries show a remarkably consistent pattern. In this classic work, Thomas Sowell analyzes this pattern. He describes the two competing visions that shape our debates about the nature of reason, justice, equality, and power: the "constrained" vision, which sees human nature as unchanging and selfish, and the "unconstrained" vision, in which human nature is malleable and perfectible. A Conflict of Visions offers a convincing case that ethical and policy disputes circle around the disparity between both outlooks.

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - applemcg - LibraryThing

the first few chapters held my attention. Sowell's treatment of constrained and unconstrained vision were sufficient. Intellectual and erudite, but not captivating. On first glance,unconstrained and ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

A CONFLICT OF VISIONS: Ideological Origins Of Political Struggles

Nutzerbericht  - Kirkus

A broadly sweeping philosophical analysis, Sowell's new book performs a useful service for people interested in contemporary politics: it attempts to lay out objectively the basic differences between ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

The Role of Visions 3
3
Constrained and Unconstrained Visions 9
9
Visions of Knowledge and Reason 36
36
Visions of Social Processes 69
69
Varieties and Dynamics of Visions 102
102
APPLICATIONS
131
Visions of Equality 133
133
Visions of Power 156
156
Visions of Justice 192
192
Visions Values and Paradigms 230
230
Notes 265
265
Index 307
307
Urheberrecht

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 38 - We are afraid to put men to live and trade each on his own private stock of reason ; because we suspect that this stock in each man is small, and that the individuals would do better to avail themselves of the general bank and capital of nations, and of ages.
Seite 299 - I do not doubt for a moment that by the same reasoning that would justify punishing persuasion to murder, the United States constitutionally may punish speech that produces or is intended to produce a clear and imminent danger that it will bring about forthwith certain substantive evils that the United States constitutionally may seek to prevent.
Seite 26 - It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. But what is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary...
Seite 72 - I should tell you that in my course I have known and, according to my measure, have cooperated with great men; and I have never yet seen any plan which has not been mended by the observations of those who were much inferior in understanding to the person who took the lead in the business.
Seite 83 - To avoid therefore the evils of inconstancy and versatility, ten thousand times worse than those of obstinacy and the blindest prejudice, we have consecrated the state, that no man should approach to look into its defects or corruptions but with due caution; that he should never dream of beginning its reformation by its subversion; that he should approach to the faults of the state as to the wounds of a father, with pious awe and trembling...
Seite 122 - It is not so with the Distribution of Wealth. That is a matter of human institution solely. The things once there, mankind, individually or collectively, can do with them as they like.
Seite 192 - Justice is the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is of systems of thought. A theory however elegant and economical must be rejected or revised if it is untrue; likewise laws and institutions no matter how efficient and well arranged must be reformed or abolished if they are unjust.
Seite 115 - ... after the productive forces have also increased with the all-round development of the individual, and all the springs of cooperative wealth flow more abundantly...
Seite 21 - People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.
Seite 46 - The statesman, who should attempt to direct private people in what manner they ought to employ their capitals, would not only load himself with a most unnecessary attention, but assume an authority which could safely be trusted, not only to no single person, but to no council or senate whatever, and which would nowhere be so dangerous as in the hands of a man who had folly and presumption enough to fancy himself fit to exercise it.

Über den Autor (2007)

Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of dozens of books including Charter Schools and Their Enemies, winner of the 2021 Hayek Book Prize. He is the recipient of numerous other awards, including the National Humanities Medal, presented by the President of the United States in 2003.
 

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