History of the gems found in North Carolina

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E.M. Uzzell & co., public printers and binders, 1907 - 60 Seiten
 

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Seite iv - State Geologist Chapel Hill. LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL CHAPEL HILL, NC, November 15, 1906. To His Excellency, HON. RB GLENN, Governor of North Carolina. Sir. — I have the honor to submit for publication as Bulletin No. 12 of the Geological and Economic Survey, the report of Dr. George Frederick Kunz on the History of the Gems found in North Carolina. Yours obediently, JOSEPH HYDE PRATT, State Geologist.
Seite 59 - Smith" says that the crystals, when cut and polished, resemble the emerald in luster though the color is not so intense as in the finer varieties of the latter gem. Prof. Edward S. Dana says that, owing to its dichroism, it has a peculiar brilliancy which is wanting in the true emerald. Thomas T. Bouve , of Boston, says : " One might infer from the statement made of the great brilliancy of both the hiddenite and garnet, when compared with the emerald, that this should decide their relative beauty;...
Seite 18 - C. (see description, page 55), various shades of gem ruby corundum have been found. Two of the best rubies of good color that have ever been found at this mine are in the collection of Clarence S. Bement, of Philadelphia; there are also a number of fine ones in the United States National Museum at Washington. Many of the smaller crystals of various shades of pink to red are transparent near the outer surface and near their extremities, and from these small gems can be cut, but few that arc worth...
Seite 52 - The crystals vary from £ of an inch to 1J inches in diameter, and are rarely over 1 inch in length. Though not clear, they have rather a fine emerald color, and penetrate the quartz and feldspar in an irregular manner. This green and white mixture is very pleasing; and as the feldspar has a hardness of 6.5, the quartz of 7, and the emerald of about 8, the whole can -be cut and polished together. Pieces are cut en cabochon, showing sections of one or more emerald crystals on the top and sides of...
Seite 69 - ... decomposition of a feldspathic rock. Large and richly colored zircons, sometimes as much as 2 ounces in weight, and of fine shades of brown and honey-red, are found in Iredell County.'. Within the past 20 years some demand has arisen and continued for minerals containing the rare earths, — zirconia, thoria, etc., — as these substances are used for the mantles or hoods of the Welsbach and other forms of incandescent gas burners. This demand led to active search throughout the world for the...
Seite 58 - Also numerous isolated prismatic crystals up to 2V-; centimeters in length; many rather pale in color, but 3 crystals, presented by Mr. Hidden, in 1893, of a rich emerald-green. The yellow tinge exhibited by this mineral in even the darkest green gems will prevent it from competing with the emerald, since it is this very quality that has kept down the prices of the Siberian demantoids, or Uralian emeralds, as the green garnets are variously termed. The finest crystal of lithia emerald ever found...
Seite 5 - The portion of the State which has yielded these valuable substances is that known as the Piedmont region— a broad belt of country, as its name indicates, at the foot of the mountains, along the eastern base of the Blue Eidge. The rocks here are metamorphic and crystalline, with some Cambrian beds a little farther west. There runs throughout much of this region a belt or belts of itacolumite, the so-called " flexible sandstone," which is also found in Brazil and in the Ural Mountains, and has frequently...
Seite 37 - An almost unique gem in the collection of the United States National Museum at Washington is a piece of amethyst found at Webster, NC, and deposited by Dr. HS Lucas. The present form is just such as would be made by a lapidary in roughly shaping a stone, preliminary to cutting and polishing it. It was turtle-shaped when found, though the shape was unfortunately destroyed by chipping, and was said to have borne marks of the handiwork of prehistoric man. It now measures 3f inches (6 centimeters) in...
Seite 5 - the occurrence of the 2 crystalline varieties of carbon in that State, — the graphite in beds interstratified with schist or gneiss; the diamond in the debris of such rocks, associated with gold, zircon, garnet, monazite, and other minerals, and after speaking of this occurrence in connection with rocks of identical age, as a very interesting circumstance, he says : " The diamond has not been observed in North Carolina in any more recent strata, and in the itacolumite regions no diamonds have...

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