The American Journal of Science and Arts

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S. Converse, 1864
 

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Seite 126 - OLIVER (Professor)— FIRST BOOK OF INDIAN BOTANY. By Professor DANIEL OLIVER, FRS, FLS, Keeper of the Herbarium and Library of the Royal Gardens, Kew, With numerous Illustrations. Extra fcap. 8vo. 6s. 6d.
Seite 151 - PENROSE'S (FC) Principles of Athenian Architecture, and the Optical Refinements exhibited in the Construction of the Ancient Buildings at Athens, from a Survey. With 40 Plates. Folio. 61. 5s. PERCY'S (Jons, MD) Metallurgy of Iron and Steel ; or, the Art of Extracting Metals from their Ores and adapting them to various purposes of Manufacture. Illustrations. Svo. 42s. PHILLIPP (CHARLES SPENCER MARCH) On Jurisprudence. Svo. 12s. PHILLIPS' (JOHN) Memoirs of William Smith, the Geologist.
Seite 4 - Let P be the point of equal attraction between any planet and the one next interior, the two being in conjunction ; P', that between the same and the one next exterior. Let also D = the sum of the distances of the points P, P...
Seite 271 - ... of heat-vibrations, but they also appear to cast some light on the physical constitution of the atom itself. They seem to lead to the conclusion that the ultimate atom itself is essentially elastic. For if heat-vibrations do not consist in excursions of the atom, then it must consist in alternate expansions and contractions of the atom itself. This again is opposed to the ordinary idea that the atom is essentially solid and impenetrable ; but it favors the modern idea that matter consists of...
Seite 240 - Nor would I exclude altogether the action of glaciers in eastern America, though I must dissent from any view which would assign to them the principal agency in our glacial phenomena. Under a condition of the continent in which only its higher peaks were above the water, the air would be so moist, and the temperature so low, that permanent ice may have clung about mountains in the temperate latitudes. The striation itself shows that there must have been extensive glaciers, as now, in the extreme...
Seite 401 - Pouillet's measurements, a square metre of the earth's surface receives on the average 4*408 units of heat from the sun per minute. Since one unit of heat is equivalent to 367 Km, it follows that one square metre of the surface of our globe receives per minute an addition of vis viva equal to 1620 Km, or the whole of the earth's surface in the same time 825,000 billions of Km. A power of 75 Km per second is called a horse-power. According to this, the effect of the solar radiation in mechanical work...
Seite 2 - Supposing the ring to be fluid and continuous, we found that it will necessarily be broken up into small portions. " We conclude, therefore, that the rings must consist of disconnected particles ; these may be either solid or liquid, but they must be independent. The entire system of rings must therefore consist either of a series of many concentric rings, each moving with its own velocity, and having its own system of waves, or else of a confused multitude of revolving particles, not arranged in...
Seite 196 - To be convinced of the importance of this precantion, it is sufficient to watch the operation of the furnace for a few moments, when an intermittent stream may be- seen to flow into a reservoir provided for it, and which by the former process was completely lost in the earth. On taking up the foundations of some of the old furnaces, within the last two years, the metal was found to have penetrated, or rather permeated, completely through the foundation and clay of the substructure down to the bed-rock...
Seite 306 - THE STREAM OF LIFE ON OUR GLOBE: Its Archives, Traditions, and Laws, as revealed by Modern Discoveries in Geology and Palaeontology. A Sketch in Untechnical Language of the Beginning and Growth of Life, and the Physiological Laws which govern its Progress and Operations. Second Edition. Crown 8vo, cloth, 6s. MIVART, ST. GEORGE, FRS, VPZS...
Seite 403 - ... especially, may be assigned as causes of this general movement of the waters. The westerly direction of the latter, however, is not confined to the region of easterly winds; it is met with in the region of perpetual calms, where it possesses a velocity of several miles a day ; it is observed far away from the tropics both north and south, in regions where westerly winds prevail, near the Cape of Good Hope, the Straits of Magellan, the arctic regions, &c. A third cause for the production of a...

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