Manual of Classical Literature

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E.C. & J. Biddle, 1845 - 690 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

lia Rhaetia Noricum Pannonia Illyri
32
rian culture p 323328
33
other buildings of the citadel 108110
41
puise to Grecian 41
44
general division of Asia 151155 Coun
46
Pluto 3537 Apollo 3810 Diana 132137
47
salem 170 Mesopotamia Étºi
53
meals 53 Social repasts 54 Dress
55
Tyrtaeus 54 Sappho 55 Solon
58
of Africa 174176 Egypt 177
59
Venus Cupid 5154 Vulcan W 5556 118133 118 Three periods
61
Pythagoras 59 Anacreon 60 Pindar
63
racters of different Hellenic tribes Actual
65
gods p 113124 nored specially among their own people
68
Oaths Leagues 70 Oracles
76
class 69 70 Coelus Ş71 72 Sol or He cules 1 25 126 Theseus 127 128
77
known in the heroic ages 83 Eloquence
84
Olympic 85 Pythian 86 Nemean
87
Christian Era 92 Of a period subse
93
distinguished by peculiarities 92 Draco
98
Era of Themistocles 8991 Era
102
Sophists and Rhetoricians p 490496
108
dors Notaries c 103 Athenian
111
General references 114 Gorgias
115
flicting death 116 Public rewards
120
Sparta 123 The Senate Ephori
125
Nemesis 84 AEsculapius Ş85 Plutus 132 Heroes of the Trojan war
133
retained especially by the Spartans 136
136
The divisions of the army
142
Manuscripts 100 Utility
143
Eustathius 146 Gregorius Pardus
145
cities 149 Treatment of captured places
150
rewards and punishments 152 Means
156
The different meals Manner
162
Eumathius
165
spending the day at Athens 163 Enter
169
Four Major Cynic 174 Stoic
173
costume attitudes 164 Busts The early existence in Chaldaea and Egypt
176
Gold and silver 175 Greek system
177
and customs respecting marriage
183
divisions of time day month and year
186
Vestal virgins 219 Fratres Arva
218
Different schools 178 Frequent demand 2 23 Etruscan paintings 224
224
les Curiones and others 220 Customs
226
Oracles W 227 Lots 228 Divisions
232
term 193 Gerns early known 194 flourishing period of this art in Greece
235
Ludi Gladiatorii 236 Ludi Florales
237
Dionysius Halicarnasseus
248
turies 253 Patricians and plebeians
253
Arrian 251 Appian 252 Dion Cas
259
dicine first practised at Rome by Greek
267
forms 309312 Tragedy 313317
313
Comedy 318 Atellane Fables
319
Mimes 319 b Pantomime 320 Ori
326
Lyric 330 331 Bucolic 332
332
Elegiac 334336 Didactic
337
General references Collections
348
Of the sources of Roman culture
359
letters 116 The early and later ortho
365
Horace S 364 Ovid 365 Cornelius
367
Phaedrus 373 Persius Ş 374 L
378
Preliminary Remarks p 379381
379
384 Calpurnius W385 Ausonius Proba
384
Requisites in the artist connoisseur
391
earliest ages 391 Influence of Greek
394
the later ages 402 Panegyrical oratory
404
First rhetoricians at Rome Opposition
415
nius Marcellus 428 Pomponius Festus
429
events and arranging them in order
431
PART
433
604
435
of Roman epistles extant The earliest
441
philosophy 447 Numa a philosopher
448
perors Introduction of oriental views
454
Cynic 460 Epicurean 461 Skeptic
462
Fathers 467 General references S
468
OEconomists p 614622
475
Romans Survey of the Empire 481
481
Class of writers termed CEconomists
491
Dioscorides 272 Aretaeus 273
538
Spurious or Apocryphal writings 285
544
Solinus 496 Vibius Sequester 497
616

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Seite 130 - A monster, having the head and breasts of a woman, the body of a dog, the tail of a serpent, the wings of a bird, and the paws of a lion.
Seite 254 - Oral. i. 52. 1. The senate assumed to themselves the guardianship of the public religion ; so that no new god could be introduced, nor altar erected, nor the sibylline books consulted, without their order, Liv.
Seite 354 - It was sent as a present to King Charles I. from Cyrillus Lucaris, a native of Crete, and patriarch of Constantinople, by Sir Thomas Rowe, ambassador from England to the Grand Seignior, in the year 1628. Cyrillus brought it with him from Alexandria, where, probably, it was written. In a schedule annexed to it, he gives this account ; that it was written...
Seite 473 - ... and its gates proudly hung with trophies. Sophocles appears with splendid dignity, like some imperial palace of richest architecture, the symmetry of whose parts, and the chaste magnificence of the whole, delight the eye, and command the approbation of the judgment. The pathetic and moral Euripides hath the solemnity of a Gothic temple, whose storied windows admit a dim, religious light, enough to show...
Seite 98 - A god of the infernal regions, son of Nox and Erebus, who conducted the souls of the dead in a boat over the rivers Styx and Acheron.
Seite 34 - Ayogi, in which several streets terminated, was embellished with temples and statues. It also contained the edifices, in which the senate, the ephori, and other bodies of magistrates assembled.
Seite 429 - STYLE. After the dismemberment of the Roman empire, the arts degenerated so far, that a custom became prevalent of erecting new buildings with the fragments of old ones, which were dilapidated and torn down for the purpose. This gave rise to an irregular style of building, which continued to be imitated, especially in Italy, during the dark ages. It consisted of Grecian and Roman details, combined under new forms, and piled up into structures wholly unlike the antique originals. Hence the names Greco-gothic...
Seite 13 - All these cities were connected with each other, and with the capital, by the public highways, which, issuing from the Forum of Rome, traversed Italy, pervaded the provinces, and were terminated only by the frontiers of the empire. If we carefully trace the distance from the wall of Antoninus to Rome, and from thence to Jerusalem, it will be found that the great chain of communication, from the north-west to the south-east point of the empire, was drawn out to the length of four thousand and eighty...
Seite 302 - It consists of a square building, containing a small chamber, by the side of which is a door giving admission to a small court surrounded by a high wall. The entrance to the chamber is at the back. From the level of the outer wall there rise two steps, supporting a marble cippus richly ornamented. Its front is occupied by a bas-relief and inscription...
Seite 294 - None of the more generous wines were reckoned fit for drinking before the fifth year, and the majority of them were kept for a much longer period. The most pleasant and grateful for drinking, however, was that of a middle age; although the older might command a higher price.

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