Further researches on the physics of the earth, and especially on the folding of mountain ranges [etc.]

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Seite 267 - We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. To this purpose the philosophers say that nature does nothing in vain, and more is in vain when less will serve; for nature is pleased with simplicity, and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.
Seite 150 - Class of 1894 TEACHER OF GEOLOGY AT HARVARD FROM 1894 TO 1925 The Gift of GS HOLDEN RW SAYLES RAF PENROSE E. WIGGLESWORTH 1926...
Seite 176 - To form some conception of the degree of coarse-grainedness indicated by this conclusion, imagine a globe of water or glass, as large as a football,1 to be magnified up to the size of the earth, each constituent molecule being magnified in the same proportion. The magnified structure would be more coarse grained than a heap of small shot, but probably less coarsegrained than a heap of footballs.
Seite 177 - Kelvin has shown that, if a drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth, the molecules of water would be of a size intermediate between that of a cricketball and of a marble.
Seite 183 - It seems, therefore, nearly certain, with no other evidence than is afforded by the tides, that the tidal effective' rigidity of the earth must be greater than that of glass*.
Seite 157 - The New Theory of Earthquakes and Mountain Formation as illustrated by Processes now at work in the Depths of the Sea.
Seite 272 - ... may confidently come to the conclusion that the forces which slowly and by little starts uplift continents, and those which at successive periods pour forth volcanic matter from open orifices, are identical.
Seite 177 - The molecule system probably presents some sort of analogy with that of a triple star ; the three atoms, replacing the stars, revolving about one another in some sort of dance which cannot be exactly described. I doubt whether it is possible to say how large a part of the space occupied by the whole molecule is occupied by the atoms ; but perhaps the atoms bear to the molecule some such relationship as the molecule to the drop of water referred to. Finally, the corpuscles may stand to the atom in...
Seite 183 - The solid crust would yield so freely to the deforming influence of sun and moon that it would simply carry the waters of the ocean up and down with it, and there would be no sensible rise and fall of water relatively to the land.
Seite 226 - Where Andes, giant of the western star, Looks from his throne of clouds o'er half the world.

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