Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms

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C.E. Goodspeed, 1902 - 441 Seiten

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Seite 39 - I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion, Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them...
Seite 128 - There are a sort of men, whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond...
Seite 159 - Swift as a shadow, short as any dream ; Brief as the lightning in the collied night, That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth. And ere a man hath power to say, — Behold ! The jaws of darkness do devour it up : So quick bright things come to confusion.
Seite 106 - The earth that's nature's mother is her tomb; What is her burying grave that is her womb, And from her womb children of divers kind We sucking on her natural bosom find, Many for many virtues excellent, None but for some and yet all different.
Seite 169 - Her own shall bless her: Her foes shake like a field of beaten corn, And hang their heads with sorrow: Good grows with her: In her days, every man shall eat in safety Under his own vine, what he plants...
Seite 68 - Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul Of the wide world dreaming on things to come, Can yet the lease of my true love control, Supposed as forfeit to a confined doom.
Seite 310 - By certain scales i" the pyramid ; they know, By the height, the lowness, or the mean, if dearth Or foison follow. The higher Nilus swells, The more it promises : as it ebbs, the seedsman Upon the slime and ooze scatters his grain, And shortly comes to harvest.
Seite 275 - Now, whether it be Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple Of thinking too precisely on the event, A thought which quarter'd, hath but one part wisdom And ever three parts coward, I do not know Why yet I live to say ' This thing's to do;' Sith I have cause and will and strength and means To do't.
Seite 124 - Your face, my thane, is as a book, where men May read strange matters : — to beguile the time, Look like the time ; bear welcome in your eye, Your hand, your tongue : look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under it.
Seite 113 - Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room. Even in the eyes of all posterity That wear this world out to the ending doom.

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