The British Drama: pt. 1-2. Comedies

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William Miller, printed by James Ballantyne, 1804
 

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Seite 3 - Learn to be wise, and practise how to thrive; That would I have you do: and not to spend Your coin on every bauble that you fancy, Or every foolish brain that humours you. I would not have you to invade each place, Nor thrust yourself on all societies, Till men's affections, or your own desert, Should worthily invite you to your rank. He that is so respectless in his courses, Oft sells his reputation at cheap market. Nor would I, you should melt away yourself In flashing bravery, lest, while you...
Seite 260 - To know this, and yet continue to be in love, is to be made wise from the dictates of reason, and yet persevere to play the fool by the force of instinct.— O here come my pair of turtles,— what, billing so sweetly!
Seite 267 - Weary of her, I am and shall be. No, there's no end of that. No, no, that were too much to hope. Thus far concerning my repose. Now for my reputation. As to my own, I married not for it, so that's out of the question, and as to my part in my wife's Why, she had parted with hers before, so bringing none to me, she can take none from me. 'Tis against all rule of play, that I should lose to one who has not wherewithal to stake.
Seite 34 - Come on, sir. Now you set your foot on shore In Novo Orbe ; here's the rich Peru : And there within, sir, are the golden mines, Great Solomon's Ophir!
Seite 257 - Millamant had forfeited the moiety of her fortune, which then would have descended to my wife; and wherefore did I marry, but to make lawful prize of a rich widow's wealth, and squander it on love and you?
Seite 77 - Of what was common, to my private use ; Nay, when my ears are pierced with widows' cries, And undone orphans wash with tears my threshold, I only think what 'tis to have my daughter Right honourable ; and 'tis a powerful charm Makes me insensible of remorse, or pity, Or the least sting of conscience.
Seite 273 - Law ! I care not for law. I can but die, and 'tis in a good cause. — My lady shall be satisfied of my truth and innocence, though it cost me my life. Lady Wish.
Seite 258 - If the familiarities of our loves had produced that consequence of which you were apprehensive, where could you have fixed a father's name with credit, but on a husband? I knew Fainall to be a man lavish of his morals, an interested and professing friend, a false and a designing lover...
Seite 35 - Have look'd no way, but unto public good, To pious uses, and dear charity Now grown a prodigy with men. Wherein If you, my son, should now prevaricate, And, to your own particular lusts employ So great and catholic a bliss, be sure A curse will follow, yea, and overtake Your subtle and most secret ways.
Seite 62 - I much hope it. These were your father's words. If e'er my son Follow the war, tell him it is a school Where all the principles tending to honour, Are taught if truly followed...

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