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children by this union. His wife was a
Sentlewoman of Worcestershire, the choice
of whom met with the approbation of his

family. But a man of his volatile disposition was ill calculated for the sober pleasures of matrimony: she died, however, in good time for both parties; before age came on to incite a further distaste in her husband; and before (as might perhaps hare been the case) he had disgraced himself by golding ill treatment to neglect*.

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Like many other managers of a theatre, he had his amours; and by a connection of this sort he had two sons. One died before the father; the other, though left without any fortune, was taken under the protection of a friend (I believe, Mr. Jewel, the present treasurer of the Haymarket theatre), who humanely continued that protection to the death of his young ward.

Foote's mother, who brought a large fortune to her husband as heiress to the Goodere estates, was latterly, by a carelessness and dissipation so peculiar to this family, in a great measure a dependent on her son's bounty ; as was also his brother, who was brought up to the church. To the latter he allowed sixty pounds a year, besides the freedom of his table and theatre; to the former a pension of one hundred pounds till her death, which happened some years before that of her son *.

he ought not to attribute it to a supernatural cause ? he replied, No; I never could bring my mind to that: but this I can tell you; it has made such an impression upon me, that if I once thought so, I would not be ou of a convent a single day longer."

* Under one of her temporary embarrassments,

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children by this union. His wife was gentlewoman of Worcestershire, the choice of whom met with the approbation of his family. But a man of his volatile disposition was ill calculated for the sober pleasures of matrimony: she died, however, in good time for both parties; before age came on to incite a further distaste in her husband; and before (as might perhaps have been the case) he had disgraced himself by adding ill treatinent to neglect*.

* The following curious circumstance took place soon after this marriage. He and his wife were invited by his father to spend a month with him in Cornwall; when, very much to their surprise, on the first night, as they were going to bed, they were entertained with a concert of music, seemingly under their window, executed in a capital style. This lasted about twenty minutes. On relating the circumstance next morning to the father, and complimenting him upon his gallantry, he absolutely denied any knowledge of the affair, and doubted the possibility of its occurring. The young couple, however, were positive as to what they had heard ; and our hero was so impressed by it, that he made a memorandum of the time, which afterwards turned out to be the very night of his uncle, Sir John Dineley Goodere, being murdered by his unnatural brother.

Foote always asserted the fact of this occurrence with a most striking gravity of belief, though he could by no means account for it. One day, being asked whether

Like many other managers of a theatre, he had his amours; and by a connection of this sort he had two sons. One died before the father; the other, though left without any fortune, was taken under the protection of a friend (I believe, Mr. Jewel, the present treasurer of the Haymarket theatre), who humanely continued that protection to the death of his young ward.

Foote's mother, who brought a large fortune to her husband as heiress to the Goodere estates, was latterly, by a carelessness and dissipation so peculiar to this family, in a great measure a dependent on her son's bounty ; as was also his brother, who was brought up to the church. To the latter he allowed sixty pounds a year, besides the freedom of his table and theatre; to the former a pension of one hundred pounds till her death, which happened some years before that of her son *.

he ought not to attribute it to a supernatural cause ? he replied, “No; I never could bring my mind to that: but this I can tell you; it has made such an impression upon me, that if I once thought so, I would not be out of a convent a single day longer." * Under one of her temporary embarrassments, she

In respect to his public conduct, his wellknown character as a satirist, and a man of free discourse, subjected him to much misrepresentation. Judging of him by the supposed malice of dragging an individual before the tribunal of an audience, or by the exact propriety of a bon-mot, the world attached no small share of ill nature and profligacy to his character: though he undoubtedly may have thought that in the one respect he was benefiting society, in somewhat the same manner as a surgeon does who dissects a diseased subject for the purpose of promoting the general health of mankind; and

wrote the following laconic epistle to our hero ; which, with his answer, exhibit no bad specimen of the thoughtless dispositions of the two characters :

DEAR SAM,

“ I AM in prison for debt : come and assist your loving mother,

« E. FOOTE."

" DEAR MOTHER,

“ SO am I ; which prevents his duty being paid to his loving mother by her affectionate son,

“ SAM. Foote."

P.S. I have sent my attorney to assist you ; in the mean time let us hope for better days.”

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