Bulletin - United States Geological Survey, Issue 381, Part 2

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Page 109 - ... of the Leucite Hills may settle this point. STRATIGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY. Structurally the Rock Springs field consists of a huge dome of Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks, which rises in the midst of the nearly horizontal rocks of the Green River Basin and partly divides the southern portion into two smaller basins — the Bridger Basin on the west and the Red Desert or Washakie Basin on the east. The major north-south axis of the dome is approximately 90 miles long and is located close to the west limb...
Page 32 - Geology of the Bighorn Mountains: Prof. Paper US Geol. Survey No. 51, 1906.
Page 78 - Rs. 90 and 91 W., and a very few in T. 14 N., R. 89 W. In the summer of 1907 a line of levels was run diagonally across the field from a United States Coast and Geodetic Survey bench mark at Rawlins, on the Union Pacific Railroad, to Baggs, bench marks being set about every 3 miles from Rawlins to Muddy Bridge and two between Muddy Bridge and Baggs. From these bench marks and from those in the area east of Battle Mountain established during the topographic survey of the Encampment special quadrangle...
Page 109 - The three largest tributaries of Bitter Creek — Killpecker, Little Bitter, and Salt Wells creeks — have been shaped indirectly by the fold. On account of the difference in the hardness of the beds these valleys extend in the main along the strike of the beds and are approximately at right angles to Bitter Creek. In some places, as in the valleys of Salt Wells and Black Buttes creeks, the small streams cut across several of the ridges before joining the main stream, and one of the tributaries...
Page 141 - Fi2 1.46 1.60 1.46 1 36 1.42 1.29 1 21 1.38 1.24 1.16 The Rock Springs coal as a locomotive fuel or steam coal has few superiors in the West. It burns under a forced draft without heavy sparking and is a quick steamer, leaving only a small quantity of ash. Although the coals of the Almond, Black Buttes, and Black Rocks coal groups have been mined and prospected very little in the past, the future no doubt will see extensive mining on all these coal beds. During the summers of 1 907 and 1 908 two...
Page 107 - Steamboat Mountain, thence south to Point of Rocks, Black Buttes, and around the south end of the dome back to Rock Springs. Lines were run one-fourth to one-half mile apart, and the outcrops of all the more important coal beds were traversed and the traverses tied to land corners.
Page 98 - Shale, gray 2 19 2 tering extend vanning from almost nothing to several feet from the actual seat of burning. A quarter of a mile southeast of Muddy Bridge a small caved drift in the '"Laramie" formation exposes about 18 inches of bituminous shale underlain by a few feet of dirty coal. Xear by the bituminous shale has been burned, causing baking, reddening, and slumping of the overlying shaly sandstone, but the dirty coal composing the lower part of the bed is apparently not affected. In this connection...
Page 115 - In the north half of the dome numerous intrusive and extrusive masses have been forced up through the Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks and cap these rocks in several localities. The exposures of leucite range from talus-covered hills, isolated volcanic necks, and associated dikes to lava flows with cones, intruded sheets, and dikes. Many of the lava sheets present abrupt walls from 50 to 100 feet in height. Some of the lava flows and volcanic necks lie along fault lines through which the molten mass...
Page 130 - ... coating, which is probably due to the alteration of the weathered coal. The chief impurities of the coal are sulphur balls and small lenses of pyrite that are scattered somewhat irregularly through the bed. The higher coals are also distinctly black, with a bright luster as they come from the mine. They show more traces of iron stain than the Rock Springs coal anil contain considerable gypsum and salt flakes in the joints or bedding planes.
Page 4 - Weathering of coal in the arid region of the Green River Basin, Sweetwater County, Wyo., by AR Schultz.

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