Transactions of the ...annual Meeting of the Missouri State Medical Association, Band 30

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Seite 149 - ... on subjects of medical police, public hygiene, and legal medicine. It is their province to enlighten the public in regard to quarantine regulations — the location, arrangement, and dietaries of hospitals, asylums, schools, prisons, and similar institutions — in relation to the medical police of towns, as drainage, ventilation, etc. — and in regard to measures for the prevention of epidemic and contagious diseases...
Seite 142 - There is no profession, from the members of which greater purity of character, and a higher standard of moral excellence are required, than the medical ; and to attain such eminence, is a duty every physician owes alike to his profession and to his patients.
Seite 140 - Even the female sex should never allow feelings of shame or delicacy to prevent their disclosing the seat, symptoms and causes of complaints peculiar to them. However commendable a modest reserve may be in the common occurrences of life, its strict observance in medicine is often attended with the most serious consequences...
Seite 145 - ... 4. In consultations, the physician in attendance should deliver his opinion first ; and when there are several consulting, they should deliver their opinions in the order in which they have been called in. No decision, however, should restrain the attending physician from making such variations in the mode of treatment, as any subsequent unexpected change in the character of the case may demand.
Seite 146 - A physician who is called upon to consult, should observe the most honorable and scrupulous regard for the character and standing of the practitioner in attendance; the practice of the latter, if necessary, should be justified as far as it can be, consistently with a conscientious regard for truth, and no hint or insinuation should be thrown out which could impair the confidence reposed in him or affect his reputation.
Seite 138 - Frequent visits to the sick are in general requisite, since they enable the physician to arrive at a more perfect knowledge of the disease, to meet promptly every change which may occur, and also tend to preserve the confidence of the patient. But unnecessary visits are to be avoided, as they give useless anxiety to the patient, tend to diminish the authority of the physician, and render him liable to be suspected of interested motives.
Seite 146 - Should an irreconcilable diversity of opinion occur when several physicians are called upon to consult together, the opinion of the majority should be considered as decisive ; but if the numbers be equal on each side, then the decision should rest with the attending physician. It may, moreover sometimes happen, that two physicians cannot agree in their views of the nature of a case, and the treatment to be pursued. This is a circumstance much to be deplored, and should always be avoided, if possible,...
Seite 147 - ... and regard for truth and probity will permit ; for it often happens that patients become dissatisfied when they do not experience immediate relief, and, as many diseases are naturally protracted, the want of success, in the first stage of treatment, affords no evidence of a lack of professional knowledge and skill.
Seite 143 - All practitioners of medicine, their wives, and their children while under the paternal care, are entitled to the gratuitous services of any one or more of the faculty residing near them, whose assistance may be desired.
Seite 142 - ... immunities, incurs an obligation to exert his best abilities to maintain its dignity and honor, to exalt its standing, and to extend the bounds of its usefulness. He should therefore observe strictly, such laws as are instituted for the government of its members; should avoid all contumelious and sarcastic remarks relative to the faculty, as a body; and while, by unwearied diligence, he resorts to every honorable means of enriching the science, he should entertain a due respect for his seniors,...

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