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37. Fame, a commendable Passion,

..140

38. The Works of Creation,..

..142

39. Luxury and Avarice,....

144

40. On Slavery,...

.146

41. On Grieving for the Dead,

148

42. On Remorse,..

149

43. On Human Grandeur,........

.151

44. The Effect of Association of Ideas on the Belief of Mankind, .152

45. The Encounter of Brave and the Panther,...

.155

46. St Paul at Athens,...

.159

47. Dramatic Poets,

.161

48. Security,

.163

49. On the Sublime in Writing.............

164

HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL EXTRACTS.

1. Our natural Fondness for History, and its true Use........

168

2. Character of Francis the First and of Charles the Fifth,

.169

3. Character of William the Third,..

.170

4. Character of Mr Pitt..........

..173

5. Character of Lord Clive,

.174

6. Character of Addison,..

.176

7. Character of James Watt,

.177

8. Character of Hannibal,.

..179

9. Character of Mary, Queen of Scots, .

..180

PATHETIC EXTRACTS.

1. St Peter's Chapel in the Tower,.

.182

2. The Funeral of the Fisherman's Son, from the Antiquary,

3. Maria.-Part I.,

4. Maria.- Part II........

.187

SPECIMENS OF PULPIT ELOQUENCE.

1. The Change produced by Death,

.190

2. Charity,

.191

3. Infidelity,

191

4. Religious Knowledge a Source of Consolation,

.193

5. Spiritual Blindness,..

.194

6. The Works and Attributes of the Almighty,

..197

7. The Injustice of War,........

...198

8. Prayer,

..200

9. The State of Man before the Fall,

201

10. The departed Spirits of the Just are Spectators of our Conduct on

Earth,...

.203

11. Religious Knowledge,

.204

12. The End of the Year,

.206

13. The Promises of Religion to the Young,

.208

14. Autumn,....

.209

SPECIMENS OF MODERN ELOQUENCE.

1. The British Monarchy,

.212

2. Peroration to Sheridan's Speech in the Case of Warren Hastings......212

3. Extract from Mr Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, ...... 213

4. Lord Lyttelton's Speech on the Repeal of the Act called the Jew

Bill, A. D. 1753, .

.216

5. Arbitrary Power not given to Man,......

.218

6. Extract from Henry Brougham's Speech at the Liverpool Election,

1812,

.219

.........183

...186

.........

............

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7. The True Policy of Great Britain,.......

.221

8. Speech of Lord Chatham, in the House of Peers, against the Ameri-

can War, and against employing the Indians in it,

.222

9. Extract from a Speech of Mr Canning on Parliamentary Reform, .....225

10. Peroration of Mr Grattan's Speech on the Opening of the Irish Par-

liament, 1790,...

.227

11. Peroration of Mr Erskine's Speech on the Age of Reason,..

.229

12. Extract from Charles Fox's Charge against Warren Hastings..... .231

SPECIMENS OF ANCIENT ELOQUENCE.

1. The Value of Literature,.....

.232

2. The Roman People adjured by the Example of their Ancestors to

avenge the Outrages committed by Mithridates,.

.233

3. The Achievements of C. Pompey,

.234

4. The Beginning of the First Philippic of Demosthenes,

.235

5. Hannibal to his Soldiers.....

.238

6. The Scythian Ambassadors to Alexander,...

240

POETRY.

Rules for Reading Verse,

.243

On Scanning,........

246

XTRACTS IN VERSE.

1. The Month of March,

.247

2. The Cuckoo, ....

.247

3. Thou art, O God,

.248

4. Horatius offering to defend the Bridge,

249

5. Sketch of Chatham,.....

.250

6. Sketches of Burke and Garrick,.

.251

7. Slavery,.....

.252

8. Confidence in God,.............

.252

9. To the Skylark,

10. Hope, the Friend of the Brave...........

255

11. The Moral Change anticipated by Hope,..........

.256

12. On the Downfal of Poland,

.257

13. The Immortality of the Soul,.

.258

14. Affliction,.....

.260

15. Jerusalem,..

.261

16. Compensation,...

..261

17. Vanity of Human Wishes,............

18. The Death of Marmion,

263

19. Hymn of the Hebrew Maid,

.264

20. On the Arrival of the British Army in Portugal to assist the Natives

in expelling the French,..

..265

21. From the Bride of Abydos,..

..266

.22. On Ancient Greece..........

23. Love,

24. Alexander the Great. From the Tenth Book of Lucan's Pharsalia,..268

25. The Battle of Hohenlinden,

.269

26. Table Talk, ..

.270

27. Ode to the Departing Year,

.272

28. The Nymph lamenting the Death of her Fawn,

..274

29. Suing for Court Favour,

..275

30. Old Age and Death,

.276

31. The Benedicite Paraphrased,

.276

32. Conversation,....

.277

33. The Two Owls and the Sparrow,..

.279

34. Courage in Poverty,......

..280 -

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35. Prologue to Cato; 1713.......

.280

36. Character of Villiers, Duke of Buckingham,..

.281

37. Character of Shaftesbury,

.282

38. The Art of Criticism,

283

39. Harmony of Expression,

284

40. On Man,

285

41. Universal Order,.

.287

42. Conclusion of the Dunciad,..

288

43. Vice and Virtue,......

.288

44. The Treasures of the Deep, ..

.289

45. Address to the Nightingale,

.290

46. From the Spirit's Epilogue in Comus,

.292

47. Excelsior...........

.292

48. Freedom,

.293

49. The Village Preacher,

.294

50. The beautiful, but still and melancholy Aspect of the once busy and

glorious Shores of Greece.........

..296

51. From the Traveller,......

.297

52. To the Memory of my beloved Master, William Shakspeare, and what

he hath left us, ..

53. A Ship Sinking,

..299

54. Solitude,

..300

55. Happiness the Reward of Virtue,....

.301

56. Ode on the Fate of Tyranny,

.302

57. Grongar Hill,....

.304

58. Worth makes the Man, .....

.308

59. On the Plain of Marathon,.

.308

60. The Siege of Corinth,.......

.310

61. Christian and his Comrades at Otaheite,...

.311

62. Sonnet.- The World is too much with us,..

.313

63. Sonnet composed upon Westminster Bridge,.....

..313

64. Hymn to Adversity, .

.314

BLANK VERSE.

1. Retirement,

..315

2. From Milton's Comus,...

..316

3. On Slavery,

..317

4. Despondency rebuked by Fame,......

.318

5. Address to Evening,

.319

6. Description of Evening,....

.319

7. Perseverance,

.320

8. Forest Scenery,

.321

9. The Good Preacher and the Clerical Coxcomb,.

.321

10. Cardinal Wolsey's Speech to Cromwell,..

322

11, Human Life,

.323

12. Flattery unworthy of a Poet,

.324

13. Description of Adam and Eve,.

.325

14. Satan's Remorse, .

.325

15. Autumn Evening Scene..........

.327

16. On Death,

.328

17. Apostrophe to Night,

.329

18. Hymn on the Seasons,

.330

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3. From the Play of As you Like It,..................

336

4. Coriolanus and Aufidius,....

.340

5. Master Matthew and Bobadil,.

6. Palemon and Arcite, Captives in Greece, ............

346

.348

7. The Quarrel of Brutus and Cassius,..

8. Marino Faliero and Angiolina,

.352

..355

9. Hesperus and Floribel, from the Bride's Tragedy,.

10. Hector and Andromache,

..356

11. Cato's Senate,

...357

SPEECHES.

1. Speech of Henry V. to his Soldiers at the Siege of Harfleur,...........360

2. Zanga's Reasons for hating Alonzo,........

..361

.361

3. Falconbridge to King John,..

4. Marino Faliero to the Conspirators,

.362

5. Henry V.'s Speech at Agincourt,....

.364

6. Richard II. to Sir Stephen Scroop on receiving the News of the

Revolt of his Subjects,....

..365

.366

7. How Douglas learned the Art of War,.

8. Othello's Apology,.

.367

9. Cassius against Cæsar,

.368

10. Address of Ion,....

..370

11. The Duke Aranza to Juliana, from the Honey-Moon........ .371

.372

12. Speech of Prince Edward in his Dungeon,..

13. Oration in Praise of Coriolanus,....

.372

14. Eve's Address to Adam after dreaming that she had tasted of the

Tree of Knowledge,

.373

15. The Passions, an Ode,....

.374

16. Alexander's Feast, or the Power of Music: Ode for St Cecilia's Day..377

17. Speech of Rolla,...

.380

18. Virginius appealing to his Fellow-Citizens to rescue his Daughter

from the Hands of Appius,

.381

19. Clarence's Dream, .

.382

20. Hamlet's Advice to the Players,..

.384

SOLILOQUIES.

1. Henry the Fourth's Soliloquy on Sleep,.........

..385

2. Lady Randolph's Soliloquy,

.385

.386

3. Cato's Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul,

4. Hamlet's Soliloquy on Death,...

..387

5. Samson Agonistes,..

.388

COMIC EXTRACTS.

1. Conclusion of Phil. Fudge's Letter to his Brother, Tim. Fudge, Esq.

Barrister-at-Law,

.390

2. Contest between the Nose and Eyes,..

3. The Monkey,

.393

4. Lodgings for Single Gentlemen........

.394

5. The Well of St Keyne,

.395

6. The Newcastle Apothecary,

.397

7. Justice and the Oyster,

.399

Different Methods by which the Principles and Lessons

may be successfully taught.

ܪ

BEFORE attempting to read the examples on inflections, a thorough knowledge of the two slides, or inflections of voice, (page 9), must be obtained. Without a very accurate knowledge of these two slides of the voice, no graceful progress in reading can possibly be made.

The Table of inflections contains thirty lines. After being able to exemplify the slides in the first column, proceed to acquire a like knowledge of the second. This being done, endeavour to read the table backwards ; that is, read the 16th line, and then the lst; the 17th, and then the 2d ; the 18th, and then the 3d, &c.; in the last place, read the table across; that is, read the 1st line and then the 16th ; the 2d, and then the 17th ; the 3d, and tnen the 18th, &c.

Under the heads of Inflections, Accent, Emphasis, and Pauses, the Rules are printed in italics : these, it is understood, will be either atten. Lively studied, or committed to memory by the Pupil, according to cir. cumstances. A single rule may be given out each day as an exercise ; the examples under which being read the day following:

The notes and exanıples under them may be read by the Student im. mediately after the rules to which they belong ; but, by those less ad. vanced, they may be entirely passed over, and not read till a perfect knowledge has been attained of what is of more importance.

In reading the Lessons, the principles should be gradually reduced to practice. Words that require the rising inflection, may, by the Pupil, be marked with a pencil with the acute accent; and such as require the falling inflection, with the grave accent. Emphatical words may be marked by drawing a straight line over them; and where a rhetorical pause is admissible, a mark, such as a comma, may be inserted after the word.

If this process should be thought too tedious, the Pupil may be requested to mark (while the Teacher is reading the Lesson) only the principal inflections : it being always understood, however, that the Pupil has acquired a knowledge of the different slides, and degrees of force of the voice.

The following Rule, to which, though there are many exceptions, may perhaps be of some advantage; the knowledge of it, at least, is easily acquired.

The falling inflection almost always takes place at a period, very often at a colon, and frequently at a semicolon ; at the conima immediately preceding either of these points, the rising inflection commonly takes place. When this rule does not hold good, the Teacher can easily point out the exceptions to it.

It must be carefully observed, that every falling, or every rising in. Alection, does not necessarily terminate upon the same key, or on the same note of that key ; neither is every emphatic word pronounced with the same degree of force : for, as various as inflections and emphases are in number, almost as varied should be the manner of pronouncing them.

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