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quently published" "Catch that Catch can,' as Shakspere's plays, as is supposed to have been well as another work which he names. This is originally sung in them, or that may have been a question into which we shall not enter, our introduced in them shortly after their proonly object being to give such music, as part of duction.

2 SCENE III.—“I see, love hath made thee a quently used to express a poor contemptible tame snake."

fellow." We have no doubt that the allusion Upon this passage the commentators simply was

simple was to the snake made harmless by the serpent say, “This term was, in our author's time, fre

charmer.

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ACT V. 23 SCENE III,_" It was a lover, and his lass." | a duet, unless the two pages sang in unison

| performed in the play, either as this was origin. In the Signet-Office library at Edinburgh is a ally acted, or not long after its production. But MS. in 4to., formerly in the possession of Mr. whether our conjecture—and only as such we Heber, containing many songs set to music, and offer it be well or ill founded, there can be no among them the following. It seems quite clear doubt that the composition is one of those that this manuscript cannot have been written which, in musical chronology, is classed as later than sixteen years after the publication of ancient. We here give it, with the simple and the present play, and may have existed at a modern accompaniment, as it is printed in the much earlier period; it is, therefore, not strain. Collection of National Airs,' edited by Mr. ing probability too hard to suppose that the air Chappell (vol. i. p. 81), á valuable work, to here inserted was, in some form-most likely as which we have before been indebted.

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Although Shakspere has not given a name | Anne of Brittany incorporated that last and either to the duchy in which the scene is laid, most independent province with the royal door the duke who has been deprived of it, we minions. Illuminations of the reign of Charles have one point to guide us in our selection of VIII., the immediate predecessor of Louis XII., the costume of this exquisite comedy,-namely, have been elsewhere suggested as furnishing a the circumstance of an independent duchy in picturesque and appropriate costume for the France. The action must therefore be supposed usurping duke and his courtiers, and a MS. in to take place before the union of the great fiefs the Royal Library at Paris (Rondeaux Chants to the crown, and consequently not later than

Costume of Shakespear's Comedy of As You Like It, the reign of Louis XII., whose marriage with | by J. R. Planché.' 12mo, London, 1825.

Royal, No. 6989) as supplying the hunting dress tation on the clowns of Shakspere, has made the of the time. Many of the former are engraved following remarks on the dress of this chain Montfaucon's 'Monarchie Française,' and racter :-"Touchstone is the domestic fool of some figures from the latter will be found in Frederick, the duke's brother, and belongs to Mons. Willemin's superb work, 'Monumens the class of witty or allowed fools. He is inédites, &c.' The dress of a shepherd of this threatened with the whip, a mode of chastiseperiod may be found in Pynson's 'Shepherd's ment which was often inflicted on these motley Kalendar:' and the splendid Harleian MS. personages. His dress should be- & party No. 4425, presents us with the ordinary habits coloured garment. He should occasionally of an ecclesiastic when not clad in the sacred carry a bauble in his hand and wear ape's ears vestments of his office or order.

to his hood, which is probably the head-dress The late Mr. Douce, in his admirable disser intended by Shakespeare, there being no-allu

See also Modus le Roy. Livre de ChassePolin sion whatever to a cock's head or a comb." Chambery, 1486.

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