Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy

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Clarendon Press, 26.07.2007 - 304 Seiten
In his writings, Hume talks of our 'gilding and staining' natural objects, and of the mind's propensity to 'spread itself' on the world. This has led commentators to use the metaphor of 'projection' in connection with his philosophy: Hume is held to have taught that causal power and self are projections, that God is a projection of our fear, and that value is a projection of sentiment. By considering what it is about Hume's writing that occasions this metaphor, P. J. E. Kail spells out its meaning, the role it plays in Hume's work, and examines how, if at all, what sounds 'projective' in Hume can be reconciled with what sounds 'realist'. In addition to offering some highly original readings of Hume's central ideas, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy offers a detailed examination of the notion of projection and the problems it faces.
 

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Inhalt

PART I RELIGION AND THE EXTERNAL WORLD
1
PART II MODALITY PROJECTION AND REALISM
75
PART III VALUE PROJECTION AND REALISM
145

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Über den Autor (2007)


Peter Kail is a University Lecturer in the History of Modern Philosophy at St Peter's College, University of Oxford.

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