Temples, tombs, and monuments of ancient Greece and Rome

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T. Nelson&Sons, 1871 - 307 Seiten
 

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Seite 13 - tis haunted, holy ground, No earth of thine is lost in vulgar mould, But one vast realm of wonder spreads around, And all the Muse's tales seem truly told, Till the sense aches with gazing to behold The scenes our earliest dreams have dwelt upon: Each hill and dale, each deepening glen and wold Defies the power which crush'd thy temples gone: Age shakes Athena's tower, but spares gray Marathon.
Seite 136 - twere anew, the gaps of centuries; Leaving that beautiful which still was so, And making that which was not, till the place Became religion, and the heart ran o'er With silent worship of the great of old...
Seite 141 - While stands the Coliseum, Rome shall stand ; " When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall ; " And when Rome falls — the World.
Seite 135 - Midst the chief relics of almighty Rome ; The trees which grew along the broken arches Waved dark in the blue midnight, and the stars Shone through the rents of ruin ; from afar The watchdog bay'd beyond the Tiber ; and More near from out the Caesars...
Seite 135 - Gladiator's bloody Circus stands, A noble wreck in ruinous perfection ! While Caesar's chambers, and the Augustan halls, Grovel on earth in indistinct decay.
Seite 192 - There is a stern round tower of other days, Firm as a fortress, with its fence of stone, Such as an army's baffled strength delays, Standing with half its battlements alone, And with two thousand years...
Seite 155 - No, great Dome of Agrippa, thou art not Christian! canst not, Strip and replaster and daub and do what they will with thee, be so! Here underneath the great porch of colossal Corinthian columns, Here as I walk, do I dream of the Christian belfries above them; Or, on a bench as I sit and abide for long hours, till thy whole vast Round grows dim as in dreams to my eyes, I repeople thy niches, Not with the Martyrs, and Saints, and Confessors, and Virgins, and children, But with the mightier forms of...
Seite 11 - Look once more, ere we leave this specular mount, Westward, much nearer by south-west, behold, Where on the ^Egean shore a city stands, Built nobly, pure the air, and light the soil; Athens, the eye of Greece, mother of arts 240 And eloquence, native to famous wits Or hospitable, in her sweet recess, City or suburban, studious walks and shades.
Seite 33 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty, That had their haunts in dale, or piny mountain, Or forest by slow stream, or pebbly spring, Or chasms and watery depths; all these have vanished; They live no longer in the faith of reason.
Seite 157 - And when all beheld Him, where he lay, how changed from yesterday, Him in that hour cut off, and at his head His last great work ; when, entering in, they looked...

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