Astronomical Register: A Medium of Communication for Amateur Observers and All Others Interested in the Science of Astronomy, Band 12

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J. D. Potter., 1875
 

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Seite 57 - The Physical Geography of the Sea and its Meteorology ; or, the Economy of the Sea and its Adaptations, its Salts, its Waters, its Climates, its Inhabitants, and whatever there may be of general interest in its Commercial Uses or Industrial Pursuits.
Seite 264 - I join,' says Draper, in the pious prayer of Alhazen, ' that in the day of judgment the All-Merciful will take pity on the soul of Abur-Raihan, because he was the first of the race of men to construct a table of specific gravities.' If all this be historic truth (and I have entire confidence in Dr. Draper), well may he 'deplore the systematic manner in which the literature of Europe has contrived to put out of sight our scientific obligations to the Mahommedans.
Seite 256 - I watched carefully on the 24th from sunrise to nine o'clock, and from a little before ten until noon, and at one in the afternoon, being called away in the intervals by business of the highest importance which, for these ornamental pursuits, I could not with propriety neglect.
Seite 264 - Wisdom, he sets forth the connection between the weight^ of the atmosphere and its increasing density. He shows that a body will weigh differently in a rare and a dense atmosphere ; he considers the force with which plunged bodies rise through heavier media.
Seite 241 - It would require no inordinate thickening of the layer of vapour to double this absorption ; and it is perfectly evident that, with a protecting envelope of this kind, permitting the heat to enter, but preventing its escape, a comfortable temperature might be obtained on the surface of our most distant planet.
Seite 213 - D' — hence the appellation hydrogenous. Occasionally the sodium and magnesium lines also appear, and that even near the summit of the clouds; and this phenomenon was so much more frequently observed in the clear atmosphere of Sherman as to suggest that, if the power of our spectroscopes were sufficiently increased, it would cease to be unusual. The genesis of this sort of prominence is problematical. They have been commonly looked upon as the debris and relics of eruptions, consisting of gases...
Seite 214 - Their form and appearance change with great rapidity, so that the motion can almost be seen with the eye — an interval of fifteen or twenty minutes being often sufficient to transform, quite beyond recognition, a mass of these flames fifty thousand miles high, and sometimes embracing the whole period of their complete development or disappearance.
Seite 187 - ... the substances by which in both cases the light was emitted. The great fixity of carbon seems, indeed, to raise some difficulty in the way of accepting the apparently obvious inference from these prismatic observations. Some comets have approached sufficiently near the sun to acquire a temperature high enough to convert even carbon into vapour.
Seite 264 - The determination of the densities of bodies as given by Alhazen approach very closely to our own. ' I join,' says Draper, ' in the pious prayer of Alhazen, that in the day of judgment the All-Merciful will take pity on the soul of Abur-Raiban, because he was the first of the race of men to construct a table of specific gravities.
Seite 261 - THE MOON: CONSIDERED AS A PLANET, A WORLD, AND A SATELLITE. BY JAMES NASMYTH, CE, AND JAMES CARPENTER, FRAS Late of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich.

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