The Miscellaneous Works of Edward Gibbon, Esq: With Memoirs of His Life and Writings

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Mr Gibbon publishes his first work Essai sur 1Etude de la Literature Some
56
The Author passes some time at Paris gives an account of the persons with whom
71
Some account of Mr Gibbons studies at Lausanne preparatory to his Italian
85
Mr Gibbon and Mr Deyverdun engage in a periodical work intended as a con
86
Mr Gibbon by the desire of Ministry writes the Memoire Justificatif By
99
Mr Gibbon pays a visit to Lord Sheffield in England Remarks on Lord Shef
108
Narrative continued by Lord Sheffield and by letters from Mr Gibbon
118
Mirabeaus work Sur la Monarchic Prussienne and his Correspondence Secrette
127
Account of Monsieur Necker Character of Mr Burkes book on the French
134
Narrative continued by Lord Sheffield An account of his visit to Lausanne
141
Narrative continued by Lord Sheffield Account of Mr Gibbons health
178
LETTER Page 159 Mr Deyverdun to Mr Gibbon Aug 20 1783 332
184
LETTER Page Introduction by the Editor to the Letters contained in the Appendix
188
Mr Crevier to Mr Gibbon On a disputed passage in Livy lib xxx c 44
189
The Same to the Same The subject continued Oct 12 1756
192
Professor Breitinger to Mr Gibbon On different passages of Justin Oct 22 1756
195
The Same to the Same The subject continued
201
Mr Gibbon to Mr Gesner Concerning Piso to whom Horace addressed his Art of Poetry and the time of Catulluss death
203
Mr Gesner to Mr Gibbon In answer to the former
208
Mr Gibbon to Mr Gesner The same subject continued
211
Mr Gibbon to On the government of Berne
216
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Porten 1756
225
Dr Waldtgrave to Mr Gibbon Dec 7 1758
227
Mr Gibbon to his Father Upon the subject of visiting Italy 1760 227 13 Mr Mallet to Mr Gibbon Inclosing a letter from Count de Caylus 1761
230
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon Account of Mr Helvetius Feb 12 1763
234
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Account of the Borromean Islands and Turin May 16 1764
236
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Account of his return through Paris and of Madame Necker Oct 31 1765
240
The Same to the Same Upon Mr Holroyds marriage April 29 1767 240 20 The Same to the Same Beriton Oct 16 1769
242
The Same to the Same Nov 18 1771
243
The Same to the Same News from Denmark 1772 243 25 The Same to the Same Feb 3 1772
244
The Same to the Same Princess of Wales Feb 13 1772 245 28 The Same to the Same Mr Foxs ResignationFeb 211772 246 29 Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gib...
246
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd May 26 1772
247
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd On the same subject July 301772 247 33 The Same to Mrs Gibbon Aug 7 1772
248
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Oct 13 1772
254
The Same to the Same Dec 11 1772
255
The Same to the Same EastIndia affairs January 12 1773
256
The Same to the Same at Edinburgh David Hume c Aug 71773
257
41 The Same to the Same from PortEliot Sept 101773
258
The Same to the Same Jan 1774
259
The Same to the Same 1774
260
The Same to the Same Boston Port Bill March 6 1774
261
The Same to the Same Account of Mr Clarkes Death April 21774
262
The Same to the Same April 21 1774
263
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd Political Jan 18 1776
272
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd American affairs attacks upon the first volume 1776 2
274
Dr Watson to Mr Gibbon On the same subject Nov 41776
279
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd American affairs Nov 7 1776
280
The Same to the Same American affairs 1777
283
The Same tothe Same Nov 1777
290
The Same to the Same June 12 1778
292
The Same to the Same Spanish preparations Sept 25 1778
293
Dr Watson to Mr Gibbon Jan 14 1779
294
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon On his vindication March 10 1779
295
Dr Robertson to the Same With a character of Hayleys Essay on His tory Nov 6 1781
305
The Same to the Same Change in the ministry character of Mr Hayleys poetry July 3 1782
306
The Same to Lord Sheffield New administration 1782
307
The Same to the Same Political Oct 14 1782
308
The Same to the Same Jan 17 1783
309
Dr Priestley to Mr Gibbon In answer Feb 3 1783
310
Mr Gibbon to Dr Priestley Feb 6 1783
312
Dr Priestley to Mr Gibbon Feb 25 1783
313
Mr Deyverdun to Mr Gibbon In answer June 10 1783
316
Mr Gibbon to Mr Deyverdun Upon the same subject June 24 1783 321 153 Mr Deyverdun to Mr Gibbon In answer 326 154 Mr Gibbon to Mr Dey...
326
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield Upon his intention of quitting England July 10 1783
328
The Same to Mr Deyverdun July 31 1783
329
The Same to Lord Sheffield Aug 18 1783
331
The Same to Lady Sheffield Aug 30 1783
334
The Same to Mr Deyverdun Sept 9 1783
335
The Same to the Same Sept 121783
336
The Same to the Same From Dover and Boulogne Sept 17 1783
337
The Same to the Same His arrival at Lausanne mention of the Abbe Raynal Sept 30 1783
338
The Same to Lady Sheffield Manner of passing his time at Lausanne Oct 28 1783
340
The Same to Lord Sheffield Comparison of Lord Sheffields situation as a politician with his at Lausanne Nov 14 1783
341
The Same to the Same Political India Bill c Dec 20 1783
343
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Porten Account of his situation Dec 27 1783
344
The Same to Lord Sheffield On the dismission of the coalition adminis tration c Jan 241784 34G 175 The Same to the Same Political Feb 2 1784
348
The Same to the Same Upon losing his seat for Coventry exhortation to relinquish parliament and politics May 11 1784
350
The Same to Mrs Gibbon Account of his situation May 28 1784
352
The Same to Lord Sheffield June 19 1784
355
The Same to Lady Sheffield Extraordinary persons at Lausanne M Necker Prince Hen y c account of his situation Oct 22 1784
356
The Same to the Same On the report of Mr Gibbons death English at Lausanne Sept 5 1785
363
The Same to the Same Some account of his studies Jan 17 1786
367
The Same to Sir Stanier Porten On the same subject May 12 178fi
369
The Same to Lord Sheffield Observations on Lord Sheffields publications c July 22 1786
370
The Same to Mr Cadell On his three last volumes Dec 16 1786
372
The Same to Iord Sheffield On the same subject the commercial treaty and Caroline de Lichfield Jan 20 1787
373
The Same to Mr Cadell Feb 24 1787
376
The Same to the Same July 21 1787
378
The Same to Lady Sheffield Dec 18 1787
379
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon Feb 27 1788
380
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield June 21 1788
381
The Same to the Same Hastingss Trial Sheridans Speech June 1788
382
Dr A Smith to Mr Gibbon With thanks for his three last volumes Dec 10 1788
383
The Same to Lady Porten On Sir Stanier Portens death June 27 1789
384
The Same to the Same April 27 1791
385
The Same to Mrs Gibbon French Affairs Emigrants May 18 1791
387
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon On French Affairs c Aug 1 1792
389
The Same to Lord Feb 23 1793
395
Extracts from his Journal
462
A Collection of his Remarks and detached Pieces on different Subjects
559
Outlines of the History of the World
599
Essaisur 1Etude de la Literature 625
625
Critical Observations on the Design of the Sixth Book of the Eneid
670
A Dissertation on the Subject of LHomme au Masque de Per
693
A Vindication of some Passages in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth
713
A ii Address c
834

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Seite 108 - I will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and perhaps the establishment of my fame. But my pride was soon humbled, and a sober melancholy was spread over my mind, by the idea that I had taken an everlasting leave of an old and agreeable companion, and that whatsoever might be the future date of my History, the life of the historian must be short and precarious.
Seite 31 - What recks it them? What need they? They are sped; And, when they list, their lean and flashy songs Grate on their scrannel pipes of wretched straw; The hungry sheep look up, and are not fed, But, swoln with wind and the rank mist they draw, Rot inwardly, and foul contagion spread : Besides what the grim wolf with privy paw Daily devours apace, and nothing said: But that two-handed engine at the door Stands ready to smite once, and smite no more.
Seite 48 - After a painful struggle I yielded to my fate : I sighed as a lover, I obeyed as a son *; my wound was insensibly healed by time, absence, and the habits of a new life.
Seite 4 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar school; and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and, contrary to the king, his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.
Seite 19 - My first introduction to the historic scenes which have since engaged so many years of my life must be ascribed to an accident. In the summer of 1751 I accompanied my father on a visit to Mr. Hoare's, in Wiltshire ; but I was less delighted with the beauties of Stourhead than with discovering in the library a common book, the 'Continuation of Echard's Roman History,' which is indeed executed with more skill and taste than the previous work.
Seite 278 - For who to dumb Forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resign'd, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day. Nor cast one longing ling'ring look behind?
Seite 106 - He seemed to feel, and even to envy, the happiness of my situation ; while I admired the powers of a superior man, as they are blended in his attractive Character with the softness and simplicity of a child. Perhaps no human being was ever more perfectly exempt from the taint of malevolence, vanity, or falsehood.
Seite 760 - The religion of the nations was not merely a speculative doctrine professed in the schools or preached in the temples. The innumerable deities and rites of polytheism were closely interwoven with every circumstance of business or pleasure, of public or of private life; and it seemed impossible to escape the observance of them, without, at the same time, renouncing the commerce of mankind, and all the offices and amusements of society.
Seite 24 - The fellows or monks of my time were decent easy men, who supinely enjoyed the gifts of the founder : their days were filled by a series of uniform employments — the chapel and the hall, the coffee-house and the common room, till they retired, weary and well satisfied, to a long slumber. From the toil of reading, or thinking, or writing, they had absolved their consciences...
Seite 52 - Street, I have passed many a solitary evening in my lodging with my books. My studies were sometimes interrupted by a sigh, which I breathed towards Lausanne; and on the approach of spring, I withdrew without reluctance from the noisy and extensive scene of crowds without company, and dissipation without pleasure.

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