Modern Philosophy; Or, A Treatise of Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy from the Fourteenth Century to the French Revolution: With a Glimpse Into the Nineteenth Century

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Griffin, Bohn, and Company, 1862 - 676 Seiten
 

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Seite 651 - The gold and the crystal cannot equal it ; and the exchange of it shall not be for jewels of fine gold. No mention shall be made of coral or of pearls ; for the price of wisdom is above rubies.
Seite 388 - Isaac; (for the children being not yet born, neither having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him that calleth;) it was said unto her, The elder shall serve the younger. As it is written, Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.
Seite 575 - So that, upon the whole, we may conclude that the Christian Religion not only was at first attended with miracles, but even at this day cannot be believed by any reasonable person without one. Mere reason is insufficient to convince us of its veracity : and whoever is moved by faith to assent to it, is conscious of a continued miracle in his own person, which subverts all the principles of his understanding, and gives him a determination to believe what is most contrary to custom and experience.
Seite 665 - For not to think of what I needs must feel, But to be still and patient, all I can; And haply by abstruse research to steal From my own nature all the natural man — This was my sole resource, my only plan: Till that which suits a part infects the whole, And now is almost grown the habit of my soul.
Seite 223 - But it is manifest that Plato in his opinion of Ideas, as one that had a wit of elevation situate as upon a cliff, did descry that forms were the true object of knowledge ; but lost the real fruit of his opinion, by considering of forms as absolutely abstracted from matter, and not confined and determined by matter ; and so turning his opinion upon Theology, wherewith all his natural philosophy is infected.
Seite 651 - God understandeth the way thereof, And he knoweth the place thereof. For he looketh to the ends of the earth, And seeth under the whole heaven ; To make the weight for the winds ; And he weigheth the waters by measure. When he made a decree for the rain, And a way for the lightning of the thunder : Then did he see it, and declare it ; He prepared it, yea, and searched it out. And unto man he said, Behold, The fear of the LORD, that is wisdom ; And to depart from evil is understanding.
Seite 224 - For, if the wit be dull, they sharpen it; if too wandering, they fix it; if too inherent in the sense, they abstract it.
Seite 435 - Whereas, were the capacities of our understandings well considered, the extent of our knowledge once discovered, and the horizon found which sets the bounds between the enlightened and dark parts of things; between what is and what is not comprehensible by us, men would perhaps with less scruple acquiesce in the avowed ignorance of the one, and employ their thoughts and discourse with more advantage and satisfaction in the other.
Seite 229 - So that we are much beholden to Machiavel and others, that write what men do, and not what they ought to do.
Seite 243 - that the scope of all speculation is the performance of some action or thing to be done," and I have not any very great respect for, or interest in, mere knowing as such.

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