Forty-six Months with the Fourth R. I. Volunteers: In the War of 1861 to 1865. Comprising a History of the Marches, Battles, and Camp Life

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J. A. & R. A. Reid, printers, 1887 - 389 Seiten

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Seite 182 - The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On fame's eternal camping ground Their silent tents are spread, And glory guards, with solemn round, The bivouac of the dead.
Seite 189 - Joseph Hooker. The short time that he has directed your movements has not been fruitful of victory or any considerable advancement of our lines, but it has again demonstrated an amount of courage, patience, and endurance, that under more favorable circumstances would have accomplished great results.
Seite 189 - General who has so long been identified with your organization, and who is now to- command you, your full and cordial support and cooperation, and you will deserve success. " In taking an affectionate leave of the entire Army, from which he separates with so much regret, he may be pardoned If he bids an especial farewell to his long tried associates of the Ninth Corps. " His prayers are that God may be with you, and grant you continual success until the rebellion is crushed.
Seite 153 - No. 182, issued by the President of the United States, I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac. Patriotism, and the exercise of my every energy in the direction of this army, aided by the full and hearty cooperation of its officers and men, will, I hope, under the blessing of God, insure its success.
Seite 153 - By direction of the President of the United States I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac. As a soldier, in obeying this order, an order totally unexpected and unsolicited, I have no promises or pledges to make. The country looks to this army to relieve it from the devastation and disgrace of a hostile invasion. Whatever fatigues and sacrifices we may be called upon to undergo, let...
Seite 153 - Corps, so long and intimately associated with me, I need say nothing ; our histories are identical. With diffidence for myself, but with a proud confidence in the unswerving loyalty and determination of the gallant army now intrusted to my care, I accept its control with the steadfast assurance that the just cause must prevail.
Seite 189 - The short time that he has directed your movements has not been fruitful of victory or any considerable advancement of our lines, but it has again demonstrated an amount of courage, patience and endurance that under more favorable circumstances would have accomplished great results ; — continue to exercise these virtues, be true in your devotion to your country and the principles you have sworn to maintain...
Seite 189 - Give to the brave and skilful general who has long been identified with your organization, and who is now to command you, your full and cordial support and cooperation, and you will deserve success. In taking an affectionate leave of the entire army, from which he separates with so much regret, he may be pardoned if he bids an especial farewell to his longtried associates of the ninth corps. His prayers are that God may be with you, and grant you continued •access until the rebellion is crushed.
Seite 114 - ... on board the Vandalia, after having spiked his guns, one of which he threw into the water. He also reported that the whole of California below the pueblo had risen in arms against our authorities, headed by Flores, a Mexican captain on furlough in this country, who had but a few days ago given his parole of honor not to take up arms against the United States. We made preparations to land a force to march to the pueblo at daylight.
Seite 282 - This plan in brief was, to form two columns and to charge with them through the breach caused by the explosion of the mine, then to sweep along the enemy's line right and left, clearing away the artillery and infantry by attacking in the flank and rear — other columns to make for the crest, and the rest of the Army to cooperate.

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