The Knickerbocker: Or, New-York Monthly Magazine, Band 48

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Seite 38 - From the rich peasant cheek of ruddy bronze, And large black eyes that flash on you a volley Of rays that say a thousand things at once, To the high dama's brow, more melancholy, But clear, and with a wild and liquid glance, Heart on her lips, and soul within her eyes, Soft as her clime, and sunny as her skies.
Seite 322 - A shadow flits before me, Not thou, but like to thee ; Ah Christ, that it were possible For one short hour to see The souls we loved, that they might tell us What and where they be.
Seite 278 - ... that general Visitation™ of GOD, Who saw that all that He had made was good, that is, conformable to His Will, which abhors deformity, and is the rule of order and beauty. There is no deformity but in Monstrosity; wherein, notwithstanding, there is a kind of Beauty; Nature so ingeniously contriving the irregular parts, as they become sometimes more remarkable than the principal Fabrick.
Seite 163 - Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did ; " and so, if I might be judge, " God never did make a more calm, quiet, innocent recreation than angling.
Seite 548 - In writing or speaking, give to every person his due title, according to his degree and the custom of the place.
Seite 547 - In the presence of others sing not to yourself with a humming noise, nor drum with your fingers or feet.
Seite 291 - Sir Walter breathed his last, in the presence of all his children. It was a beautiful day — so warm that every window was wide open— and so perfectly still, that the sound of all others most delicious to his ear, the gentle ripple of the Tweed over its pebbles, was distinctly audible as we knelt around the bed, and his eldest son kissed and closed his eyes.
Seite 548 - Turn not your back to others, especially in speaking ; jog not the table or desk on which another reads or writes ; lean not on any one. 5. Be no flatterer ; neither play with any one that delights not to be played with.
Seite 590 - We are not now that strength which in old days Moved earth and heaven ; that which we are, we are ; One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
Seite 322 - Would the happy spirit descend, From the realms of light and song, In the chamber or the street, As she looks among the blest, Should I fear to greet my friend Or to say 'Forgive the wrong...

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