Introductions, and Notes and Illustrations to the Novels, Tales, and Romances of the Author of Waverley, Band 2

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Seite 181 - Where an army in battle array had march'd out. The lady sank, belike through pain, And Christabel with might and main Lifted her up, a weary weight, Over the threshold of the gate : Then the lady rose again, And moved, as she were not in pain. So free from danger, free from fear, They cross'd the court : right glad they were. And Christabel devoutly cried To the lady by her side ; ' Praise we the Virgin all divine Who hath rescued thee from thy distress!' 'Alas, alas!' said Geraldine, ' I cannot...
Seite 440 - There's such divinity doth hedge a king, That treason can but peep to what it would, Acts little of his will.
Seite 410 - Here lies our sovereign lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Seite 210 - The oaks were shatter'd on the green ; Woe was the hour — for never more That hapless Countess e'er was seen ! And in that Manor now no more Is cheerful feast and sprightly ball ; For ever since that dreary hour Have spirits haunted Cumnor Hall. The village maids, with fearful glance Avoid the ancient moss-grown wall ; Nor ever lead the merry dance Among the groves of Cumnor Hall. Full many a traveller oft hath sigh'd, And pensive wept the Countess' fall, As wandering onwards they've espied The...
Seite 7 - If a man vow a vow unto the LORD, or swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond; he shall not break his word, he shall do according to all that proceedeth out of his mouth.
Seite 209 - The village maidens of the plain Salute me lowly as they go ; Envious they mark my silken train, Nor think a Countess can have woe. " The simple nymphs ! they little know How far more happy 's their estate ; To smile for joy than sigh for woe — To be content — than to be great.
Seite 78 - ... than exalted by an attempt to reward virtue with temporal prosperity. Such is not the recompense which Providence has deemed worthy of suffering merit ; and it is a dangerous and fatal doctrine to teach young persons, the most common readers of romance, that rectitude of conduct and of principle are either naturally allied with, or adequately rewarded by, the gratification of our passions, or attainment of our wishes. In a word, if a virtuous and self-denied character is dismissed with temporal...
Seite 176 - Sir this is a busy day with us, we cannot hear you, it is Robin Hood's day. The parish are gone abroad to gather for Robin Hood. I pray you let them not.
Seite 274 - Wortlev ilontague has said, with eijual truth and taste, that the most romantic region of every country is that where the mountains unite themselves with the plains or lowlands. For similar reasons, it may be in like manner said, that the most picturesque period of history is that when the ancient rough and wild manners of a barbarous age are just becoming innovated upon, and contrasted by, the illumination of increased or revived learning, and the instructions of renewed or reformed religion.
Seite 404 - A narrative and impartial discovery of the horrid popish plot, carried on for burning and destroying the cities of London and Westminster, with their suburbs ; setting forth the several consults, orders, and resolutions of the Jesuits, concerning the same : By captain William Bedloe, lately engaged in that horrid design, and one of the popish committee for carrying on such fires.

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