The Geological Evidence of Man

Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 01.09.2005 - 432 Seiten
It's impossible to overstate the significance of this classic of scientific literature. A necessary companion to Darwin's The Origin of Species, it springs from the ingenious mind of one of his closest friends, geologist Charles Lyell, whose theories were a critical influence on Darwin's landmark work.First published in 1863, this exploration of the implications of Darwin's "natural selection" for humans remains one of the clearest, most concise explanations of a foundational branch of modern biology. Eminently insightful, the books sings with a scientific poeticism -- chapter sections have such titles as: . "Works of Art in Danish Peat-Mosses." "Curiosity awakened by the systematic Exploration of the Brixham Cave." "Two Species of Elephant and Hippopotamus coexisting with Man in France." "Extinct Mammalia in the Valley of the Oise"Readers in the sciences are sure to find this essential book a highly engaging one as well.Scottish geologist and natural philosopher SIR CHARLES LYELL (1797-1875) was one of the foremost popularizers of science of his time, and the fundamental scientific concepts he developed continue to shape geology and evolutionary biology today. He also wrote the multivolume Principles of Geology: An Attempt to Explain the Former Changes of the Earth's Surface by Reference to Causes Now in Operation. Craters on Mars and the Moon are named in his honor.
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

I
1
II
7
III
26
IV
46
V
58
VI
73
VII
83
VIII
95
XV
210
XVI
230
XVII
256
XVIII
269
XIX
277
XX
292
XXI
301
XXII
318

IX
118
X
134
XI
152
XII
162
XIII
181
XXIII
331
XXIV
354
XXV
367
XXVI
395
Urheberrecht

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 13 - ... the minimum of time required for the formation of so much peat must, according to the estimate of Steenstrup and other good authorities, have amounted to at least 4,000 years; and there is nothing in the observed rate of the growth of peat opposed to the conclusion that the number of centuries may not have been four times as great, even though the signs of man's existence have not yet been traced down to the lowest or amorphous stratum. As to the 'shell-mounds...

Über den Autor (2005)

Lyell was born in Kinnordy, Scotland. His father was a naturalist, and Lyell grew up surrounded by books on natural history, geology, and other sciences. He entered Oxford University at the age of 19 after a boarding-school education that was periodically interrupted by poor health. There his interest in geology was heightened. Although he studied law, he gave up legal work to study rocks and fossils. His contribution to geology is twofold. First, he showed that the earth is constantly changing, not by a series of worldwide catastrophes followed by new creations, but by slow, gradual processes. Like James Hutton, he believed and taught that present-day processes were the ones that shaped the past. It was the worldwide publication of Lyell's treatises and texts that led to the general acceptance of the principle of uniformitarianism, first put forth by Hutton. Second, Lyell contributed the principle of faunal succession and the notion of the time sequence of events. These were evidenced from spatial relationships among strata, faults, and intrusions. The data on which Lyell's contributions are based were gathered on numerous field excursions, most notably in southern Europe, the United States, and Canada. During these trips, Lyell collected numerous samples that he and his wife meticulously categorized and labeled. His writings show that he was also interested in, and concerned about, human problems, as well as problems of science. He touches upon social reforms in England and the problems of slavery in the United States. Lyell was a prolific writer, summarizing his thoughts, contributions, and achievements in these major works: "Principles of Geology" (1830, 1831, 1833), "Antiquity of Man," and "Travels in America." His health and strength declined after the death of his wife in 1873, and he died two years later. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Bibliografische Informationen