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"SO JOY AFTER JOY MAY GO SWEEPING OVER THE ANCIENT PAIN-(GEORGE MACDONALD)

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66 SOMETIMES FROM OTHER REALMS A TONE-(MACDONALD)

SIR LARK AND KING SUN: A PARABLE.

Our life's sun is slowly going
Down the hill of might;
And no cloud shines rosy-glowing
On the slope of night.

But the vanished corn is lying
In rich golden glooms.

In the churchyard, all the sighing
Is above the tombs.

Spring will come, slow lingering,
Opening buds of faith:

Man goes forth to meet his Spring
Through the door of death.

Welcome then, with love more lowly,
Evening lines of gray;
Welcome footfalls moving slowly
Towards the coming day.

And if thought, back-looking, lingers

On youth's withering,

'Tis to mark that Autumn's fingers

Paint in hues of Spring.

[From "The Disciple, and Other Poems," edit. 1867.]

SIR LARK AND KING SUN: A PARABLE.

OOD morrow, my lord!" in the sky alone,
Sang the lark as the sun ascended his throne.

"Shine on me, my lord; I only am come,
Of all your servants, to welcome you home.
I have flown right up, a whole hour, I swear,
To catch the first shine of your golden hair."

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BREAKS COMMON LIFE ASUNDER."-GEORGE MACDONALD.

279

DROWNED IN WAVES AND WAVES OF WEEPING, IT WILL RISE AGAIN."-GEORGE MACDONALD.

"THE TONGUES OF WHISPERING TREES TO HEAR, THE SERMON OF THE SILENT STONE;

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GOD, IN THE DREARIEST PATHS THAT MEN HAVE TROD, MACDONALD)

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SHOWS PRINTS OF SAVING FEET, BOTH OLD AND NEW."-G. MACDONALD.

TO READ IN BROOKS THE LESSON DEAR OF NATURE WORKING ALL ALONE."-MACDONALD.

FINDS MORE IN ANY HUMAN FACE, BECLOUDED ALL WITH WRONG AND DOUBT,-GEORGE MACDONALD)

"HE WHOSE HEART IS FULL OF GRACE

SIR LARK AND KING SUN: A PARABLE.

There's many a bird makes no such haste,
But waits till I come: that's as much to my taste."

And King Sun hid his head in a turban of cloud,

And Sir Lark stopped singing, quite vexed and cowed;
But he flew up higher, and thought, "Anon
The wrath of the king will be over and gone;
And his crown, shining out of its cloudy fold,
Will change my brown feathers to a glory of gold."

So he flew-with the strength of a lark he flew ;
But, as he rose, the cloud rose too;

And not one gleam of the golden hair
Came through the depths of the misty air;
Till, weary with flying, with sighing sore,
The strong sun-seeker could do no more.

His wings had had no chrism of gold;

And his feathers felt withered and worn and old;
He faltered, and sank, and dropped like a stone.
And there on his nest, where he left her, alone
Sat his little wife on her little eggs,

Keeping them warm with wings and legs.

Did I say alone? Ah, no such thing!
Full in her face was shining the king.

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Welcome, Sir Lark! You look tired," said he ;
"Up is not always the best way to me.
While you have been singing so high and away,
I've been shining to your little wife all day."

He had set his crown all about the nest,

And out of the midst shone her little brown breast:

And so glorious was she in russet gold,

That for wonder and awe Sir Lark grew cold.

281

TO BROTHERS, SISTERS, ROUND ABOUT,

THAN SHINES IN NATURE'S HOLIEST PLACE, WHERE MOUNTAINS DWELL AND STREAMS RUN OUT."-MACDONALD.

"FOR VIRTUOUS ACTS AND HARMLESS JOYS THE MINUTES WILL NOT STAY."-DR. CHARLES MACKAY.

"IF WRONG YOU DO, IN SUMMEr among the flowers,-(MacKAY)

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DR. CHARLES MACKAY.

He popped his head under her wing, and lay

As still as a stone, till King Sun was away.

[The foregoing extracts are from "The Disciple, and Other Poems," published in 1867.]

Dr. Charles Mackay.

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[CHARLES MACKAY, a lyrist of no common power, and a poet of considerable fertility of fancy and a wide and varied range of musical expression, was born at Perth in 1814. He published a small volume of poems 1834, which led to his engagement on the Morning Chronicle, then a newspaper of great influence and popularity. In 1840 appeared his "Hope of the World," followed by the airy and graceful Rosicrucian romance of "The Salamandrine" in 1842. From 1844 to 1847 Dr. Mackay (he received the distinction of LL.D. from the University of Glasgow) edited the Glasgow Argus; after which, returning to London, he contributed leading articles to the Illustrated London News for a period of years. He has also acted as special correspondent for the Times. His principal works, in addition to those already mentioned, are:-"Legends of the Isles, and Other Poems" (1845); "Voices from the Mountains" (1846); "Town Lyrics" (1847); "Egeria" (1850); "The Lump of Gold" (1855); "Under Green Leaves" (1857); "A Man's Heart" (1860); "Studies from the Antique" (1864); and the prose works of "The Thames and its Tributaries" (1840); and "Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions."]

LOUISE ON THE DOOR-STEP.

ALF-PAST three in the morning,

And no one in the street
But me, on the sheltering door-step
Resting my weary feet;

Watching the rain-drops patter

And dance where the puddles run,

As bright in the flaring gaslight

As dew-drops in the sun.

YOU MUST ATONE IN WINTER AMONG THE SHOWERS."-MACKAY.

"O PIETY, O HEAVENLY PIETY! SHE IS NOT RIGID AS A FANATIC'S Dream.”—dr. chaRLES MACKAY.

"BUT YET THE WORLD GOES ROUND AND ROUND, AND THE GENIAL SEASONS RUN;

"WHAT MIGHT BE DONE IF MEN WERE WISE,—(MACKAY)

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AND CEASED THEIR SCORN FOR ONE ANOTHER!"-MACKAY.

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AND EVER THE TRUTH COMES UPPERMOST, AND EVER IS JUSTICE DONE."-MACKAY.

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