Samuel Pepys and the World He Lived in

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Bickers and Son, 1880 - 311 Seiten
 

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Seite 32 - Lord! what can I do? I am spent: people will not obey me. I have been pulling down houses; but the fire overtakes us faster than we can do it.
Seite 38 - I must endeavour to keep a margin in my book open, to add here and there a note in shorthand with my own hand. And so I betake myself to that course, which is almost as much as to see myself go into my grave : for which, and all the discomforts that will accompany my being blind, the good God prepare me !
Seite 38 - Journal, I being not able to do it any longer, having done now so long as to undo my eyes almost every time that I take a pen in my hand ; and, therefore, whatever comes of it, I must forbear : and, therefore, resolve, from this time forward, to have it kept by my people in long-hand, and must be contented to set down no more than is fit for them and all the world to know...
Seite 208 - Up, and put on my coloured silk suit, very fine, and my new periwig, bought a good while since, but durst not wear, because the plague was in Westminster when I bought it; and it is a wonder what will be the fashion after the plague is done, as to periwigs, for nobody will dare to buy any hair, for fear of the infection, that it had been cut off the heads of people dead of the plague My Lord Brouncker, Sir J.
Seite 204 - This day the King begins to put on his vest, and I did see several persons of the House of Lords and Commons too, great courtiers, who are in it; being a long cassocke close to the body, of black cloth, and pinked with white silk under it, and a coat over it, and the legs ruffled with black riband like a pigeon's leg: and upon the whole I wish the King may keep it, for it is a very fine and handsome garment.
Seite 116 - If a man does not make new acquaintances as he advances through life, he will soon find himself left alone. A man, sir, should keep his friendship in constant repair.
Seite 200 - Very merry at, before, and after dinner, and the more for that my dinner was great, and most neatly dressed by our own only maid. We had a fricasee of rabbits and chickens, a leg of mutton boiled, three carps in a dish, a great dish of a side of lamb, a dish of roasted pigeons, a dish of four lobsters, three tarts, a lamprey pie (a most rare pie), a dish of anchovies, good wine of several sorts, and all things mighty noble and to my great content.
Seite 28 - The truth is, I do indulge myself a little the more in pleasure, knowing that this is the proper age of my life to do it ; and out of my observation, that most men that do thrive in the world do forget to take pUcutcre during the time that they are getting their estate, but reserve that till they have got one, and then it is too late for them to enjoy it.
Seite 87 - I set an hour by him to see him design it all ; and strange it is to see him, with his natural eyes, to cut so small at his first designing it, and read it all over, without any missing, when for my life I could not, with my best skill, read one word or letter of it ; but it is use.
Seite 168 - tis so much to mine, that I cannot easily tell you how happy I think myself, and I must be the worst man lining (which I hope I am not) if I be not a good husband. I am confident never two humours were better fitted together than ours are.

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