Water-supply and Irrigation Papers of the United States Geological Survey, Ausgaben 172-177

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906
 

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Seite 2 - Second-feet per square mile" is the average number of cubic feet of water flowing per second from each square mile of area drained, on the assumption that the run-off is distributed uniformly both as regards time and area. "Run-off in inches...
Seite 193 - The serial publications of the United States Geological Survey consist of ( 1 ) Annual Reports, (2) Monographs, (3) Professional Papers, (4) Bulletins, (5) Mineral Resources, (6) Water-Supply and Irrigation Papers, (7) Topographic Atlas of United States — folios and separate sheets thereof, (8) Geologic Atlas of the United States — folios thereof.
Seite 3 - DEFINITION OF TERMS. The volume of water flowing in a stream — the "run-off" or "discharge" — is expressed in various terms, each of which has become associated with a certain class of work. These terms may be divided into two groups — (1) those which represent a rate of flow, as secondfeet, gallons per minute, miner's inches, and...
Seite 2 - Run-off in inches" is the depth to which the drainage area would be covered if all the water flowing from it in a given period were conserved and uniformly distributed on the surface. It is used for comparing run-off with rainfall, which is usually expressed in depth in inches.
Seite 6 - ... cubic feet of water flowing per second from each square mile of area drained, on the assumption that the run-off is distributed uniformly both as regards time and area. "Run-off, depth in inches...
Seite 1 - Second-foot" is an abbreviation for cubic foot per second and is the rate of discharge of water flowing in a stream 1 foot wide, 1 foot deep, at a rate of 1 foot per second. It is generally used as a fundamental unit from which others are computed by the use of the factors given in the following table of equivalents.
Seite 4 - ... for the day when the mean gage height was highest. As the gage height is the mean for the day, it does not indicate correctly the stage when the water surface was at crest height, and the corresponding discharge was consequently larger than given in the maximum column. Likewise, in the column of "Minimum" the quantity given is the mean flow for the day when the mean gage height was lowest. The column headed "Mean" is the average flow in cubic feet for each second during the month.
Seite 2 - ... was highest. As the gage height is the mean for the day it does not indicate correctly the stage when the water surface was at crest height, and the corresponding discharge was consequently larger than given in the maximum column. Likewise, in the column headed "Minimum" the quantity given is the mean flow for the day when the mean gage height was lowest. The column headed "Mean" is the average flow in cubic feet for each second during the month.
Seite 3 - March 23, 1901). 1 second-foot equals 38.4 Colorado miner's inches. 1 second-foot equals 40 Arizona miner's inches. 1 second-foot equals 7.48 United States gallons per second; equals 448.8 gallons per minute; equals 646,272 gallons for one day.
Seite 147 - Discharge measurements are made from the downstream side of the bridge, the initial point for soundings being the face of the right abutment on the line of the hand railing.

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