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A NOVEL.

BY

MRS. GORE.

A

r "Nous ne prétendons qu'à une chose; c'est a peindre avec fidélité les
mœurs de notre temps dans un certain monde. Si le tableau est triste, nous
espérons de la justice de nos lecteurs qu'ils voudront bien ne pas s'en prendre
exclusivement a nous."—Foudbas.

IN THREE VOLUMES.
VOL. I.

LONDON:

HTJEST AND BLACKETT, PUBLISHERS,
SUCCESSORS TO HENRY COLBURN,

13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.

1857.

[The right of Translation U reserved.'] ,

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J. Billing;, Printer, 103, II at ton Garden, London, and Guildford, Surrey. THE TWO ARISTOCRACIES.

CHAPTER I.

"I'm sure I don't know what ever we're to do with him!" murmured Mrs. Barneson, the wife of a thriving apothecary in the cathedral and garrison town of W.; glancing wistfully at an uncouth, well-grown lad of eighteen, who sat refreshing himself with tea, and something more substantial than toast, in a remote corner of her roomy parlour, while two little girls in pinafores watched, with hungry faces, the progress of his meal.

VOL. I. B

"The best thing to be done with him, just now, is to let him eat his supper in peace, and go to bed after his journey," rejoined one of the elder daughters, engaged with their mother at the evening table in homely needle-work— mending or making.

"His father might be angry at missing sight of him; and Barneson won't be home these two hours. He has got to stop at Stoke on his way back."

Too intent upon his supper to be disconcerted by their observations, Mark Barneson munched on in silence. He felt himself a stranger at home. Adopted in early childhood by his mother's brother, a wealthy northcountry farmer, by whom he had been educated at a commercial school at York, his brother and sisters were as yet scarcely known to him; and though the Barneson family had outthrived the difficulties which, at the time, suggested the adoption, they had learned with dismay, at the recent decease of Mark Holden, that his nephew succeeded only to his blessing, and a legacy of five hundred pounds. The bulk of his property was bequeathed to his widow.

So bitter indeed was the disappointment of Mrs. Barneson at finding herself and her offspring overlooked by her childless brother, who, till his marriage a few years before, had treated them as his heirs, that her sisterly mourning was exhibited in hems far too narrow, and crape much too scanty, to satisfy the severe decorum of a cathedral town.

No less offensive, however, in the censorious eyes of W., was the haste with which the widowed Mrs. Holden signified to the family that steps must be taken for the removal of their son. In consequence of his uncle's marriage, he had been left overlong at school; —a superannuated head-boy, whose mathematical proficiency had put more than one bepuzzled usher to the blush; and it was really time for his parents to decide on his future career. B 2

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