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LIFE AND PUBLIC SERVICES

OF

GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT,

FROM HIS BOYHOOD TO THE PRESENT TIME.

AND

A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF

HON. SCHU YLER COLFAX.

BY

CHARLES A. PHELPS,
Late Speaker of the Mass. House of Representatives, and President of the Mass. Senate.

Embellished with Two Steel Portraits, and Four Mustrations from Designs

by Hammatt Billings.

BOSTON:
LEE AND SHEPARD:

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Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by

CHARLES A. PHELPS,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

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I care nothing for promotion, so long as our arms are successful.”

Grant to Sherman, February, 1862.

“ If my course is not satisfactory, remove me at once. I do not wish in any way to impede the success of our arms.

Grant to Halleck, Feb. 6, 1862.

“No theory of my own will ever stand in the way of my executing in good faith any order I may receive from those in authority over

me.

Grant to Secretary Chase, July, 1863.

“ I shall have no policy of my own to interfere against the will of the people.”

Grant, May 29, 1868

“ Human liberty the only true foundation of human government.”

Grant's Letter to Citizens of Memphis

* LET US HAVE PEACE.”

Grant's Letter, May 29, 1868

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PREFACE.

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N answer to the question which may be asked, “ Why

say,

that he has endeavored to prepare a biography of the MAN, Ulysses S. Grant, from his boyhood to the present time, differing in some respects from others which have fallen under his observation ; showing how, from a Western boy with

; no special advantages, he has come to be the foremost man of his time. He has not attempted to give a history of the late civil war, nor a military criticism upon its campaigus, nor a passive narration of battle-scenes, but to portray the character of Gen. Grant as boy, cadet, lieutenant in the army, business-man, general, secretary of war, and his actions in each period of bis career. While the author has no desire to conceal his deep sympathy with the principles of freedom which warred with the Rebellion, and whose final triumph is involved in the approaching presidential election, yet he has sought to avoid a partisan harangue.

He has availed himself of all reliable sources of information; and special care has been taken to verify statements of fact from official sources. He has consulted freely, and acknowledges his indebtedness to, the elaborate and candid

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